Alternative Fuel Vehicles To Outsell Diesel In Netherlands In 2018

Watch As Jaguar I-PACE Visits Amsterdam The diesel car market share shrinks in the Netherlands.The Netherlands could become the first member of the European Union where the diesel car market share will be lower than Alternative Fuelled Vehicles (AFVs). We have seen such a situation in Norway, but Norway is not in EU.In August, sales of diesel amounted to 12%, while AFVs some 10%, out of which 42% were BEVs, 41% HEVs, and the remaining 17% included PHEVs. During the first eight months, most of the plug-ins were sold by Tesla (2,327 Model S and 1,319 Model X).As hybrids and plug-ins are expanding, there is no big perspective for diesel.News from the Netherlands All-electric car sales are expected to accelerate in the final months of lower BIK (Benefit in Kind) tax, which could weaken demand in early 2019, but ultimately there is no other way – for electric – then up.BIK (Benefit in Kind) tax:Current BEV BIK tax: 4% for full priceFrom January 1, 2019: 4% tax will be applied only to the amount of up to €50,000. The amount above €50,000 will be taxed 22% Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 25, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Netherlands likely to become first EU market to see #AFV outsell #diesel passenger cars this year according to new https://t.co/JrJPrKVZcd / AID research, likely to happen in September2min read:https://t.co/aIMi0yiTjk pic.twitter.com/ZjRlSpOnYb— Matthias Schmidt (@auto_schmidt) September 25, 2018 Source: Electric Vehicle News Netherlands Now #1 Market In Europe For Tesla Model S Netherlands Enjoys Three-Digit Growth Of Plug-In Car Sales Source: AID analyst Matthias Schmidt (SchmidtMatthias.de) read more

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You Can 3D Print Anything Even An Electric Motorcycle

first_img Zero Motorcycle Launches New 2019 Lineup: More, More & More Source: Electric Vehicle News Energica Unveils Stunning Bolid-E Electric Motorcycle Prototype Mad Max Motorcycle Road Rage Captured On TeslaCam BigRep’s NowLab shows that you can 3D print a motorcycle, in theory.The proliferation of 3D printers has caused a revolution in creativity, not to mention a little controversy. If you can design it, you can create it, as long as it’s made of plastic. German 3D printer manufacturer BigRep has demonstrated this yet again by printing an entire motorcycle.center_img BigRep’s experimental design group, NowLab, has created what it calls the NERA E-Motorcycle. The bike is electric, which simplifies production due to the parts not having to withstand the high temperatures of an internal combustion engine. Aside from the electrical system, the bike consists of just 15 3D-printed components of a rather innovative design. The motor integrates into the back wheel, while the battery sits within the body. The tires are airless, rather like the Michelin Tweel that provides a cushion for the tread with a compliant internal structure instead of air. NowLab says the NERA E-Motorcycle even uses forkless steering, though the details on this aren’t clear since it appears to have a traditional, if unusually shaped, front fork.There is one catch, however. NowLab says this is merely a “use case” example, an experiment just to see if it can be done. The average household 3D printer is no doubt too small to build components big enough for a bike. NowLab may be using a stronger plastic as well, though we don’t know for sure. Still, if it’s possible in a lab, it’s probably only a matter of time until the technology filters down to the public. You could find a design you like online, print it yourself, and build your own bike quite easily. This could cause a number of regulatory problems, as has already happened with 3D-printed guns. How can the government regulate the safety of open-source designs that anybody can build? But in a future where 3D printing is as common as laser printing is today, anything is possible.Sources: NowLab, Mashable More E-Bikes Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 22, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Fiat Chrysler to pay Tesla hundreds of millions for European emissions credits

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicles Magazine Fiat Chrysler (FCA) has reached a deal with Tesla to count the California carmaker’s EVs as part of the FCA fleet in order to avoid paying fines for violating new European Union emissions rules. The Financial Times reported that the deal is worth “hundreds of millions of euros.”More stringent emissions standards will take effect next year in the EU, reducing the average emissions limit to 95 grams of CO2 per kilometer. Automakers whose vehicles don’t meet the target (which will probably be all of them, with the possible exception of Renault/Nissan) are permitted to form “open pools” with other companies to reduce their fleet-wide average figures. The arrangement is similar to the system of trading ZEV credits used in California. Tesla has made over $1 billion in the last three years by selling excess emissions credits in the US.“FCA is committed to reducing the emissions of all our products,” said FCA. “The purchase pool provides flexibility to deliver products our customers are willing to buy while managing compliance with the lowest cost approach.”FCA has long been at the rear of the pack in the electrification race, and like all the legacy automakers, it’s caught between European governments’ goal of reducing emissions and European drivers’ growing appetite for gas-guzzling SUVs. The company is obviously calculating that paying to “manage compliance” is cheaper than bringing its own EVs to market (and as always, talking about reducing emissions is free).Electrek’s Fred Lambert noted that the deal is a well-timed windfall for Tesla, which appears to be going through a cash crunch, but that the extra income may not last for more than a few years. To its credit, Fiat Chrysler does have its own electrified vehicles in the pipeline – last year the company announced plans to invest 9 billion euros ($10.1 billion) in electrification over four years. Source: Reuters, BBC, ElectrekImage: Jakob Härter (CC BY-SA 2.0)last_img read more

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Watch Autoline Talk Tesla Model 3 Sandy Munro Returns

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Sandy Munro Admits Tesla Is A Cult More Than An Automaker: Video We realize that these episodes are long, and most people don’t have time to watch them in their entirety. Plus, not all of the segment pertains to EVs. Fortunately, Autoline has included the topics and time stamps in the video description below.Check it out and provide us with your insight in the comment section.Video Description via Autoline Network on YouTube:Sandy Munro Talks About Tesla in China – Autoline After Hours 458SPECIAL GUEST: Sandy Munro, Munro & AssociatesTOPICS:01:50 – Tesla Model 3, China’s Version (InsideEVs Editor’s note: This topic actually begins around the 5:10-mark)36:34 – Doctor Data40:37 – Ford’s China 2.0 program48:03 – Toyota Patents on Electrification50:00 – Sandy’s Tesla Model 3 charts1:06:26 – Rapid Fire: Model 3 QuestionsPANEL:– Frank Markus, MotorTrend– Gary Vasilash, Automotive Design & Production– John McElroy, Autoline.tvHat tip to Jim_NJ! Tesla Model 3 Teardown Expert Munro Divulges New Profit Details It’s increasingly clear that the guys at Autoline love to talk Tesla Model 3.It’s time for another episode of Autoline After Hours, and this one offers plenty of EV talk. More specifically, it begins with Sandy Munro on China’s version of the Tesla Model 3. Later in the episode, Munro shares his very compelling “Model 3 charts.” Finally, while the show is supposed to come to an end, there’s a rapid fire Model 3 question-and-answer session.More Tesla Model 3 Sandy Munro Content: Munro Talks Tesla Model 3 Motor Magic And Profit Potential Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 12, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Why Has The DOJ Stopped Civilly Enforcing The FCPA

first_imgThe Foreign Corrupt Practices Act specifically authorizes the DOJ to civilly (not just criminally) enforce the statute against non-issuers.Indeed, between 1991 and 2001 approximately 35% of all DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions were civil actions. However, the last time the DOJ invoked this express statutory remedy was in 2001 and the question is posed: why has the DOJ stopped civilly enforcing the FCPA?Make sure to read to the end of the post to hear the DOJ’s non-responsive answer to this question.Perhaps instead of creating new ways to enforce the FCPA not even mentioned in the statute (such as non-prosecution agreements, deferred prosecution agreements and most recently declinations with disgorgements) the DOJ should go back to enforcing the FCPA in ways expressly authorized by Congress.Both the 78dd-2 prong of the FCPA (applicable to “domestic concerns” – FCPA-speak for all forms of U.S. business organizations not issuers and U.S. nationals) and the 78dd-3 prong of the FCPA (applicable to “persons other than issuers or domestic concerns” – FCPA-speak for foreign companies not issuers and foreign nationals) specifically authorize the DOJ to bring civil actions for FCPA violations.For instance, 78dd-2(d) under the heading “Injunctive Relief” states in full:(1) When it appears to the Attorney General that any domestic concern to which this section applies, or officer, director, employee, agent, or stockholder thereof, is engaged, or about to engage, in any act or practice constituting a violation of subsection (a) or (i) of this section, the Attorney General may, in his discretion, bring a civil action in an appropriate district court of the United States to enjoin such act or practice, and upon a proper showing, a permanent injunction or a temporary restraining order shall be granted without bond.(2) For the purpose of any civil investigation which, in the opinion of the Attorney General, is necessary and proper to enforce this section, the Attorney General or his designee are empowered to administer oaths and affirmations, subpoena witnesses, take evidence, and require the production of any books, papers, or other documents which the Attorney General deems relevant or material to such investigation. The attendance of witnesses and the production of documentary evidence may be required from any place in the United States, or any territory, possession, or commonwealth of the United States, at any designated place of hearing.(3) In case of contumacy by, or refusal to obey a subpoena issued to, any person, the Attorney General may invoke the aid of any court of the United States within the jurisdiction of which such investigation or proceeding is carried on, or where such person resides or carries on business, in requiring the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of books, papers, or other documents. Any such court may issue an order requiring such person to appear before the Attorney General or his designee, there to produce records, if so ordered, or to give testimony touching the matter under investigation. Any failure to obey such order of the court may be punished by such court as a contempt thereof.All process in any such case may be served in the judicial district in which such person resides or may be found. The Attorney General may make such rules relating to civil investigations as may be necessary or appropriate to implement the provisions of this subsection.”Between 1991 and 2001, the DOJ resolved four corporate FCPA enforcement actions consistent with this express statutory scheme.Eagle Bus Manufacturing Inc. (see here for the prior post).American Totalisator Co. (see here for the prior post).Metcalf & Eddy Inc. (see here for the prior post).KPMG Siddharta Siddharta & HarsonoWhile 4 enforcement actions over a 10-year period may not sound like many, there were only 11 DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions between 1991 and 2001. Thus, the 4 enforcement actions highlighted above comprised 36% of all DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions during this time frame.I was curious to learn why the DOJ has stopped civilly enforcing the FCPA and thus posed the below question to the DOJ press office. Save Money With FCPA Connect Keep it simple. Not all FCPA issues warrant a team of lawyers or other professional advisers. Achieve client and business objectives in a more efficient manner through FCPA Connect. Candid, Comprehensive, and Cost-Effective. Connectcenter_img “Why has the DOJ stopped resolving corporate FCPA enforcement actions civilly through injunctions as authorized by the FCPA?In terms of background, both 78dd-2 and 78dd-3 of the FCPA authorize the Attorney General to “bring a civil action in an appropriate district court of the United States to enjoin such act or practice, and upon a proper showing, a permanent injunction or a temporary restraining order shall be granted without bond.”The DOJ first resolved a corporate FCPA enforcement action this way in 1991 and last resolved a corporate FCPA enforcement action this way in 2001. During this time frame, the DOJ resolved the below four enforcement actions this way.[link to the above four enforcement actions]While 4 enforcement actions may not sound like many, there were only 11 DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions between 1991 and 2001, thus the 4 enforcement actions comprise 36% of all corporate FCPA enforcement during this time span.Thus, the question is: Why has the DOJ stopped resolving corporate FCPA enforcement actions civilly through injunctions as authorized by the FCPA?”The full answer I received back from the DOJ press office was as follows: “We decline to comment. Thank you.”Perhaps instead of creating new ways to enforce the FCPA not even mentioned in the statute (such as non-prosecution agreement, deferred prosecution agreements and most recently declinations with disgorgements) the DOJ should go back to enforcing the FCPA in ways expressly authorized by Congress.last_img read more

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QA with mergermarkets Chad Watt the MA Expert

first_img Username Password Lost your password? Remember mecenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Chad discusses how energy M&A has evolved over the past five years, how midstream MLPs dominated in 2013 and what he predicts for 2014 . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img

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2019 Season Countdown 57 Sammy Faustin

first_imgName: Sammy FaustinHeight: 6’2″Weight: 187 lbs. High school: Naples (FL) NaplesPosition: SafetyClass: Redshirt freshmanJersey number: #17Last year: I ranked Faustin #93 and said he would redshirt (LINK). He redshirted.TTB Rating: 76 Sammy Faustin (image via Wolverines Wire) Faustin was raw coming into 2018. He had some injury issues in high school and played cornerback, when he was almost certainly bound for safety. That made him a virtual lock to redshirt. Prediction: Backup safety, special teamer 1 0You need to login in order to vote center_img Now Faustin is in a bit of an odd spot. The coaches reportedly think highly of him, but there are already players entrenched or expected to contribute ahead of him. Josh Metellus, Brad Hawkins, and J’Marick Woods are established players ahead of him, while Jaylen Kelly-Powell has a little playing time under his belt and 5-star Daxton Hill is expected to jump ahead as soon as the practice pads go on. Some of those players will start to filter away after 2019 (Metellus to the NFL, Hawkins/Hill/Woods perhaps to Viper), but right now Faustin will have to bide his time as a little used backup. Tags: 2019 season countdown, Sammy Faustinlast_img read more

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Study assesses effectiveness of chlorhexidine in preventing bacteremia after tooth extraction

first_imgJul 9 2018Yet owing to its low cost and absence of adverse reactions and complications, the research group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country recommends that these mouthwashes be usedA large number of bacteria are present in human mouths and may pass into the blood when procedures such as the removal of a tooth are carried out. Chlorhexidine mouthwashes have a powerful antimicrobial effect, but there are opposing positions on its use in these cases. The research by the UPV/EHU shows that its use would prevent 12% of cases of bacteremia.The human oral cavity is colonized by a huge variety of bacteria. When surgical procedures such as a tooth extraction are carried out, the bacteria can pass into the bloodstream causing bacteremia that is generally transient. What is not yet clear is how significant this presence of bacteria in the blood is in terms of the origin and evolution of infectious processes such as endocarditis of the heart valves, prosthetic valves, hip and knee joint replacements generally, and in local infection.Numerous studies have shown that a mouthwash containing chlorhexidine has a powerful antimicrobial effect on saliva microflora and bacterial plaque. “On the basis of this hypothesis we can assume that antimicrobial mouthwashes used before the dental procedure should reduce the number of micro-organisms that pass into the patient’s bloodstream, yet this is a hotly debated issue,” said the members of the UPV/EHU’s research group.In 1997 the American Heart Association (AHA) suggested that patients at risk of infectious endocarditis should use an antimicrobial mouthwash before a dental procedure. In 2006, the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC) recommended a single mouthwash with 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) (10 ml for 1 minute) before the carrying out of dental procedures associated with bacteremia in patients at risk. Yet in 2007 the AHA recommended against adopting any antiseptic prophylaxis protocol.Related StoriesStudy: Surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be core focus for healthcare facilitiesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustIn an effort to shed scientific light on this issue, the UPV/EHU research group comprising Iciar Arteagoitia, Carlos Rodriguez-Andrés and Eva Ramos decided to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of random controlled trials (RCT), following the PRISMA Statement. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of chlorhexidine in preventing bacteremia following a tooth extraction. The research was conducted in collaboration with the UPV/EHU’s Department of Epidemiology and was published in Plos One, the leading, open-access, global scientific journal which accepts rigorous, innovative papers on scientific research.In the study that included 8 clinical trials with 523 patients there were 267 in the group treated with chlorhexidine, in which 145 cases of bacteremia were recorded, and 256 in the control group, in which there were 156 cases of bacteremia. The results of the research therefore indicate that the percentage of cases of bacteremia that can be prevented if a population undergoes chlorhexidine-based prevention is 12%. The NNT, the number of patients that need to be treated to prevent bacteremia, is 16.The results point to the relative and not particularly significant effectiveness of the use of chlorhexidine when it comes to preventing the bacteria present in the mouth from passing into the bloodstream when dental extraction is carried out. “Yet, given its low cost and the absence of adverse reactions and complications, we would recommend a mouthwash with chlorhexidine before a procedure of this type is carried out,” concluded the UPV/EHU’s research group.Source: https://www.ehu.eus/en/-/klorhexidinak-eraginkortasun-mugatua-du-aho-interbentzioetan-infekzioak-saihestekolast_img read more

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US aging researchers prepare for loss of hungry mouse colony

The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, revealed earlier this month that it will be phasing out its colony of calorie-restricted rodents. Although most researchers who study aging won’t be affected by the decision, some scientists will have to pay substantially more for experimental mice, and some may be priced out of the field.In the 1930s, researchers first noticed that a very low-cal diet prolongs the life of some animals. This regimen, known as calorie restriction (CR), also delays age-related maladies such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. For nearly 20 years, NIA has sponsored a colony of calorie-restricted rodents, which are available only to its grantees. The price was right: Until this year, researchers paid $6 per month of the animal’s age plus shipping. And because of a rule change that went into effect in January 2014, the rodents are now free.Despite the low prices, there isn’t much appetite for the CR mice. Just eight to 10 researchers request animals from the colony each year, says NIA’s Nancy Nadon, chief of the Biological Resources Branch. On 11 June, NIA announced it would not renew the contract with the company that houses the rodents, Charles River Laboratories in Wilmington, Massachusetts. “The way the usage has changed over the last few years,” Nadon says, “it wasn’t the best way to go about using NIA funds.” (She had no estimate of what maintaining the colony costs.) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The decision won’t immediately foreclose researchers’ access to CR mice. New rodents will enter the colony until 2018, so older mice should be available into 2020. And NIA will continue to maintain a separate colony of aged rodents. If NIA-funded researchers desperately need CR animals, Nadon says it might be possible to shift some of those mice to a reduced diet.Few researchers are likely to miss the colony. Most scientists who rely on CR rodents raise them at their own institutions, so “for the majority of researchers, this shutdown will not have any effect,” writes gerontological researcher Valter Longo of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. In addition, the colony didn’t produce enough strong science, says Roger McDonald, a physiologist and cell biologist who is about to retire from the University of California, Davis.Still, some researchers will be sad to see the colony go, although they understand NIA’s financial constraints. “I think it’s a valuable and unique resource, and I hate to see it lost,” says physiologist Arlan Richardson of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City.Hardest hit will be researchers who can’t raise their own CR animals, or “who are early in their careers or are just starting out in CR research,” says Richard Weindruch, a gerontologist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.Vascular physiologist Anthony Donato of the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City agrees. “They are closing down the ability of some young investigators to pursue calorie restriction research,” he says. In large part, that’s because of the often higher cost of raising CR mice yourself. He notes that the NIA animals, which were about 30 months old, cost him about $120 to $130 apiece. But raising them at his university, which Donato now plans to do, will run about $1 per day—and the mice will have to stay on the severe diet for more than 2 years. He can afford the higher cost, but other researchers can’t.Another user of the NIA’s CR colony, nutritional immunologist Elizabeth Gardner of Michigan State University in East Lansing, is also rethinking plans and budgets. She has received the NIA mice since the late 1990s, using them for three or four projects, including for a 2011 paper that showed calorie restriction reduced the animals’ ability to recover from flu shots. Now, Gardner says, she intends to obtain mice from NIA’s aged animal colony and calorically restrict them herself, “but it will be more expensive.”Gerontologist Richard Miller of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, worries that the CR colony shutdown presages shortages at NIA’s colony of aged rodents, which more scientists depend on. Because NIA can no longer charge for the animals, it can’t recoup any of the cost of providing them. “I don’t see how they [NIA] can afford to give away mice that they used to sell,” he says. He’s concerned that NIA will also eventually have to slash the number of aged animals it furnishes. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email read more

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Exposed to dangerous radiation Telltale signs are in your blood

first_imgThe researchers subjected mice to three levels of whole-body radiation—low and high survivable doses and a deadly blast. They drew blood within 24 hours of irradiation. They also collected blood and bone marrow samples at 7, 15, 30, and 90 days to check white blood cell counts and other indicators of the health of the hematopoietic system—blood and the organs that make it—which is known to fail after heavy irradiation.The team identified 170 miRNAs and zeroed in on five that showed a recognizable pattern. The mice getting the highest dose had a markedly lower concentration of one of those five miRNAs and significantly higher levels of the other four as compared with the animals that got less radiation, the team reports online today in Science Translational Medicine. The miRNA analysis could distinguish between different radiation doses within 24 hours of exposure, even though damage to white blood cells and bone marrow was not seen until 15 days after irradiation.The researchers used the same miRNA analysis to show that a bone marrow transplant rescued mice with what would have been lethal radiation exposure. An early diagnosis could help doctors decide whether to try a bone marrow replacement or other treatments before the damage spreads to other organs.It’s “an interesting paper” and significant that miRNA analysis can predict survival, says David Brenner, a radiation biophysicist at Columbia University Medical Center. In case of an accident or attack, he says, “it would help focus potentially scarce medical resources on those people who needed them most.” MiRNA analysis could be particularly valuable for indicating the degree of damage to the individual’s hematopoietic system, which is more important for assessing treatment options than simply measuring the radiation dose, says Yoshihisa Matsumoto, a radiation biologist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology.Both scientists caution there is still a lot of work needed to turn the finding into a diagnostic test. The first hurdle is confirming that the same or similar miRNAs can be found in humans. Another challenge is that miRNA patterns might change with time and vary with individuals, possibly lessening the accuracy of the analysis. Another limitation is that this test applies only to acute radiation sickness, not to the possibility of developing cancer in the long term.Chowdhury is well aware of these issues and emphasizes that his team’s study is a first step. “Our focus right now is to see if these findings are relevant in humans,” he says. The team is hoping to collaborate with institutions that have collected samples from radiation accident victims. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country If you’re exposed to radiation from a dirty bomb or a nuclear reactor meltdown, it’s not easy for doctors to quickly determine how badly you’ve been hurt. Even serious radiation damage isn’t immediately apparent. Now, researchers say they’ve hit upon a possible rapid diagnostic test, one that looks for changes in small molecules known as microRNAs that circulate in the blood. The advance could help doctors identify and treat victims before telltale symptoms appear.MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, play a key role in processes that turn genes on and off. Researchers hope the molecules will someday prove useful as biological markers of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. MiRNAs might also help track the effectiveness of treatments.Several groups previously reported that an analysis of miRNAs circulating in blood can indicate radiation exposure. A team led by Dipanjan Chowdhury at Harvard Medical School’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston set out to take that finding a step further and see if miRNA analysis could also indicate the extent of radiation damage and predict survival. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. 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Canadian telescope finds mysterious radio flashes from deep space

first_img SEATTLE, WASHINGTON—A new Canadian radio telescope, not yet fully operational, has already detected more than a dozen of the mysteriously brief blasts from deep space known as fast radio bursts (FRBs). One is only the second known to flash repeatedly, researchers reported here today at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society. The early results from the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) suggest the scope is well on its way to adding hundreds or even thousands of FRBs to the 60 or so already known—hopefully revealing the source of these powerful millisecondslong pulses in the process.“This really points to the fact that CHIME is set to revolutionize the field of FRBs,” says Sarah Burke-Spolaor of West Virginia University in Morgantown, who was not involved in the research.FRBs are one of the hottest topics in astronomy. Researchers not only want to figure out what they are, they also want to use them to gather information about the matter that resides in the vast reaches between galaxies. As they journey through deep space, FRB pulses get spread out by all the electrons they meet, revealing information about the density of the intergalactic medium. That would be valuable input for models of the large-scale structure of the cosmos. “FRBs could be a good way to understand the evolution of our universe,” says Vishal Gajjar of the University of California, Berkeley, also not a member of the CHIME team. Andre Renard/Dunlap Institute/CHIME Collaboration Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Daniel CleryJan. 9, 2019 , 1:00 PM FRBs were first detected in 2007 by telescopes in Australia. For years, skeptical astronomers dismissed them as local effects or instrumental glitches. Because FRBs are rare, only wide-field telescopes have a chance of catching one. But these survey scopes tend not to be sensitive enough to learn much about them. And because FRBs occur in the blink of an eye, it’s too late to bring another, more sensitive, telescope to bear on it.Astronomers began to take FRBs seriously when, earlier this decade, teams figured out that the pulses came from distant galaxies. That discovery was based on the structure of the pulses themselves: Among the range of frequencies that make them up, longer wavelength photons lag behind the shorter ones, thanks to the drag of intergalactic matter. The amount of lag in an arriving pulse is too great for the FRB to be from a source within the Milky Way. Previously, some scientists thought explosive events in our galaxy such as supernovae or neutron star mergers might be responsible for the bursts.But in 2012, an FRB was found by the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico that was later shown to repeat. This ruled out one-off sources like mergers or supernovae that would be consumed in the process—for that FRB at least. Further observations with the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia told researchers that the burst, known as FRB 121102, came from a highly magnetic environment. In 2017 researchers used the Very Large Array in Socorro, New Mexico, and the European VLBI Network—a continent-wide array—to pin down its location to a small star-forming galaxy 3 billion light-years away.But what spawns FRBs remains a mystery. There are almost as many theories as there are FRB detections. An online list now has 47 entries, including neutron star-white dwarf mergers, lightning on pulsars, and alien light-sails. But with only 60 FRBs, astronomers have little to go on. Finding more FRBs—and more repeaters—will let researchers statistically analyze them, and perhaps even determine which types of galaxies spawn them.CHIME, originally designed to map clouds of interstellar hydrogen to understand the mysterious dark energy that is accelerating the expansion of the universe, aims to help. The telescope, near Penticton in British Columbia in Canada, is comprised of four, fixed 100-meter-long parabolic troughs that look straight up and scan the whole visible sky more than 24 hours.Construction was finished in 2017. In July and August 2018, while parts of the system were still being tested, CHIME bagged 13 new FRBs over 3 weeks, including the second repeater. “It was a happy surprise, with an element of relief, too,” says Ingrid Stairs of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, one of the leaders of the CHIME FRB team. Previously, no FRBs had been found at frequencies below 700 megahertz (MHz), and scientists were worried that not many FRBs would be visible in CHIME’s 400- to 800-MHz range. Shriharsh Tendulkar of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, lead author of one of two CHIME papers published today in Nature, says they want to detect across as broad a range of frequencies as possible, both to catch more FRBs and to better understand what is producing them.Burke-Spolaor says the second repeater is exciting because it confirms their existence and heralds more discoveries. Researchers can’t yet tell whether repeaters are a distinct type of FRB or a stage in their long evolution: Single FRBs, for example, could actually be repeaters that have slowed with age and burst too rarely for us to see repeats. The two known repeaters show noticeable similarities, with more structure in their pulses—a series of subbursts—than all but one of the single FRBs. “The striations in the pulses are so rich in information,” Burke-Spolaor says. “Finding more repeaters is very important because they are easier to localize [to a source galaxy].” CHIME’s results support the idea that FRBs come from dense star-forming regions and perhaps from within old supernova remnants.Researchers are already looking forward to the haul that CHIME should return when it comes online later this year. Gajjar says: “We should get busy.” Emailcenter_img A new Canadian radio telescope in British Columbia has already bagged 13 mysterious radio bursts. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Canadian telescope finds mysterious radio flashes from deep spacelast_img read more

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We may have helped give our canine pals puppy dog eyes

first_imgSarah Bickel Dog owners know the look: Your pooch stares up at you, eyes wide, and you can’t resist giving them a hug or favorite treat. A new study of dog facial anatomy suggests we may have helped create this expression by favoring canines with “puppy dog eyes” over the course of thousands of years of dog evolution.To conduct the work, researchers dissected the remains of four wolves and six dogs, focusing on their faces. They spotted two striking differences: The levator anguli oculi medialis muscle, which raises the eyebrows, was highly developed in all of the dogs but barely there in wolves. And all dogs except a Siberian husky—an ancient breed—sported a robust retractor anguli oculi lateralis muscle, which widens the eyes by pulling the eyelids towards the ears. This muscle was mostly absent in the wolves.Combined, the two muscles allow dogs to express the big, sad eyes that melt our hearts, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And indeed, when the researchers asked strangers to approach a number of shelter dogs and tame wolves, the dogs produced the sad eye look—known scientifically as “the AU101 movement”—on average five times more often and with far more intensity than the wolves did. By David GrimmJun. 17, 2019 , 3:00 PM We may have helped give our canine pals ‘puppy dog eyes’ Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email The team suspects that early in dog evolution humans were more likely to care for canines with this look, perhaps because it reminded them of the big eyes of human infants. Those dogs had more pups, and so the muscles that power big eyes spread through dog populations. Even today, shelter dogs that rock the look are more likely to find a home. The next question: whether other domestic animals like cats have hit on the same strategy.last_img read more

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Trump ocean plan axes climate chapter

first_img Read more… At issue is “Science and Technology for America’s Oceans: A Decadal Vision,” which succeeds a framework first released in 2007 during the administration of George W. Bush.The 10-year plan from the council, an interagency panel led by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), is intended to guide agencies in developing budgets and directing research. Representatives from the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other government agencies worked on the language.”Carrying out the research goals will require investments in and coordination of ocean science and technology across all levels of government and private industry, academia and nongovernmental organizations,” the executive summary states.The same summary sets five overarching goals, none of which mentions warming. The broader report mentions climate and impacts such as rising sea levels and acidification but does not have a separate goal on the issue with tied priorities. It removes earlier language about human-caused warming. Instead, mentions of climate are sprinkled within chapters such as “maritime security” and “economic prosperity.”The original 2007 ocean plan had a separate section titled “the ocean’s role in climate,” with three accompanying research priorities. One of those was “understanding of the ocean to help project future climate changes.””The ocean is getting warmer, more freshwater is being added by melting ice sheets, and more CO2 is being absorbed from the atmosphere,” the Bush-era document said.The 2013 update from the Obama administration expanded on the link between oceans and climate change with statements such as “anthropogenic greenhouse gas-induced global warming” contributes to the decline of Arctic sea ice.For Trump critics, the report is the latest signal of intent to slash budgets for climate programs and align with the views of climate skeptics. They point to actions such as an executive order this summer revising U.S. ocean policy that axed Obama language on climate and focused more on economic and security concerns.”Everything we do in the ocean now is affected by climate change. You need to research the impacts of climate change across all of these chapters,” said Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Cambridge, Massachusetts.As one example, he said discussing expanded seafood production, as the report does, without specific ties to human-driven climate change is “nonsensical,” considering the effect of warming on a range of ocean species.A former government official not authorized to speak to the press said the scientific community, including many federal scientists, is feeling “bruised” by the lack of a climate chapter.There have been other instances of the Trump administration removing climate change from guidance documents on federal research (Greenwire, 2 August).It’s unclear who made the decision to take out a specific chapter and research goal, but administration officials involved in the plan say it is intended to reflect President Trump’s priorities and present a more “integrated” approach.Technologies for mapping the ocean floor, for example, are useful for both modeling climate change and assessing energy exploration potential, according to officials.”When you read the report, it’s clear that far from being buried, climate change is addressed throughout. As the American people well know, our nation faces many issues. Climate change is one; so is global trade, economic growth, national security, education, and jobs,” said one White House official.Some outside groups praised the approach. In preliminary comments on the draft, the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in Washington, D.C., said it appreciated recognition of the concept of ocean security and a push for an educated “blue workforce.”Industry groups criticized the report for non-climate reasons. The National Ocean Industries Association in Washington, D.C., said in a statement that “while we are most supportive of the discussion of additional offshore wind resources and the potential of hydrates, the oversight of the importance of oil and natural gas presents a woefully inadequate picture of the ocean energy future.”Last year, OSTP eliminated multiple positions on climate change and the environment. At the time, officials said that much of the former climate work would continue even if sometimes housed under a different name (Greenwire, 4 August, 2017).The report seems to reflect that approach. References to climate in the new plan include a quote from the 2014 National Climate Assessment stating that “the United States has experienced more than 219 weather and climate disasters since 1980” and “a healthy, productive, and resilient ocean is inextricably linked to Earth’s climate and weather patterns.”In a section on maritime security, it discusses how “ocean acidification and warming” could contribute to less food security. Another section on “economic prosperity” calls for monitoring of rising sea levels.The report also highlights the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observation and Modeling project, which involves hundreds of robotic observation floats that play a role in assessing climate patterns.Administration officials note there is broader discussion of some areas such as “big data,” which recognizes the growth in computing power to analyze data from ocean sensors and advances in genetics.Yet many are skeptical, considering past budget requests and directives. Earlier this year, Trump proposed cutting NOAA’s budget by about a billion dollars, including programs aiming to help coastal communities and foster research on acidification.After the release last month of the newest National Climate Assessment, which issued dire warnings about warming impacts, Trump told The Washington Post that “as to whether or not it’s man-made and whether or not the effects that you’re talking about are there, I don’t see it.””It looks to me that they politically sanitized this [ocean report] for the White House perspective,” said Rosenberg.Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Originally published by E&E NewsThe White House is no longer including a distinct chapter on climate change in an overarching plan setting federal priorities on ocean policy for a decade.The move by the National Science and Technology Council is angering environmentalists, although administration officials say they are presenting the issue in a different way and emphasizing new areas. Neville Nell/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) By Christa Marshall, E&E NewsDec. 5, 2018 , 3:20 PMcenter_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Trump ocean plan axes climate chapterlast_img read more

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APS to bring more options for energy savings in 2018

first_imgAPS to bring more options for energy savings in 2018 Photo by Toni GibbonsThe future of the Cholla Power Plant still looms on the horizon, with no changes planned for the coming year. January 23, 2018center_img By Toni Gibbons In 2018 the new energy savings plans and rooftop solar are two significant areas that will be a part of the landscape for Arizona Public Service (APS) as they continue to embraceSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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Rajya Sabha nod to Indian Medical Council Amendment Bill

first_img What steps taken to tackle patriarchy in farm sector: BJD MP Bhartruhari Mahtab Related News Congress raises China transgression, Rajnath Singh says borders secure Now passed by both Houses, the Bill will replace an ordinance that was promulgated on February 21.Congress leader Jairam Ramesh said, “This is a Bill we are supporting out of compulsion and not out of conviction.”However, the National Medical Council (NMC) Bill, which has not even been introduced yet, was discussed more than the Bill at hand. Parliament Monsoon Session, harsh vardhan, new law doctors, National Medical Commission, NMC Bill, Lok Sabha, Medical Council Amendment Bill, Indian express Congress leader Jairam Ramesh said, “This is a Bill we are supporting out of compulsion and not out of conviction.”(Representational Image)The Rajya Sabha on Thursday passed the Indian Medical Council (Amendment) Bill, 2019. The Bill, introduced by Health Minister Harsh Vardhan, allows for the supersession of the Medical Council of India (MCI) by a Board of Governors for a two-year period starting September 26, 2018. Opposition criticises low priority to agriculture in Budget Advertising Ramesh said that in December 2017, the government introduced the NMC Bill, which was then referred to a Standing Committee, which submitted its report in March 2018.He said, “This is one example of a Bill which the Opposition is demanding should be brought, and the government is not bringing it.” The Congress leader also appealed to the regional parties who are part of the NDA to oppose the NMC Bill when it comes up as it is in its current form as it would “destroy the state governments’ rights” and is a “recipe for privatisation” of medical education.Samajwadi Party’s Ram Gopal Yadav said that after the Standing Committee had given its recommendation to the NMC Bill, it was not introduced even as two sessions of the Rajya Sabha passed. He said he was supporting the Bill under discussion Thursday because “if we don’t pass, the MCI will come back”.Several other parties also had apprehensions about the Bill, which, in the long term will replace through the NMC the MCI and the Board of Governors that Thursday’s Bill sought to establish. R Lakshmanan of the AIADMK said the NMC Bill ought to be discussed, as did TMC’s Santanu Sen, who also asked the government how the Governors in the current Bill will be selected.Responding to the motion, Vardhan thanked the leaders for their support even if it was “out of compulsion”. He chided the Opposition leaders for “aspersions cast on the government’s intentions”. He assured that the government would bring the NMC Bill “very soon”. Advertising Written by Krishn Kaushik | New Delhi | Published: July 5, 2019 1:06:45 am 0 Comment(s)last_img read more

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