Two injured as bakkie rolls

first_imgWebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite A Toyota bakkie crashed and rolled on the Steadville road yesterday evening (December 1) after the driver allegedly lost control of the vehicle.The bakkie veered off the road and rolled into a riverbank close to the water’s edge.Two people were in the bakkie at the time, one sustaining moderate injuries and one serious injuries.The accident victims were treated at the scene and then transported to hospital by EMRS and ER24 paramedics.Police, Public Safety and towing services also responded to the scene.last_img read more

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Optometrist hosts high tea

first_imgThe Eye Shop in Lyell Street was a place of fun and laughter on Saturday when optometrist Ilene Somai hosted a high tea. In celebration of the progress of her shop, Ladysmith’s elite were invited to join her and her family for an afternoon of yummy treats and games. WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Before the games kicked off, speeches were made by Ilene, Emnambithi/Ladysmith Municipality Mayor Cllr MV Madlala, Town Speaker Cllr Zehra Rassool and other dignitaries. Most of the speeches were about how far Ilene has come in her work and that Ladysmith can be happy to have her back in her home town.After the speeches, guests were invited to try some of the tasty treats that had been provided. The cup cakes were even branded with different glasses logos. Once guests had had a snack, the games began. There was pick a box and “match the logo” where participants had to match the logo to the brand. Great fun was had by all and everyone went home with a special gift from Ilene.last_img read more

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Bret Bielema and Arkansas have found a creative way to double

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Sponsored By Connatix Some impressive improvements are made every summer when players are left to the strength staff for eight weeks at a time. It’s a pivotal time in the growth and development of your roster, and Bret Bielema is such a big believer in that, that he and his staff created a second “summer” session for players to develop.Bielema joined Paul Finebaum yesterday and explained his two summer development plan.“One of the biggest development times in a college student-athlete’s career is during the summer, because they have eight uninterrupted weeks of just training and getting their bodies right. During my freshman year, I went from 190 to 225 and went from 235 to 265 my junior year. That’s when you put on great weight gains in strength – if you do it the right way.” “What’s better than one summer? Two summers. One of the things we do in our program is two eight-week programs. One in the summer like everybody else, but also one in January, February, March, before we even think about playing football.”“I just want our guys know you’re going to get 8 weeks of work in before you even think about putting on a uniform, because we need to get your body right.”So what you call your winter workouts and conditioning, Bielema and his staff are calling their second summer session. Why?“When I make my schedule, I don’t look at anyone else’s or pay attention to what they’re doing. I believe in development. We’re never going to have a sexy roster of five-stars or four-stars. We’ve got a bunch of guys that like to go to work every day and want to develop.”last_img read more

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8 Million Nadi Cultural Centre

first_imgFiji’s rich cultural history has inspired a New Zealand busi­nessman, who has three busi­nesses in Fiji, to invest $8 million in the construction of Meke Vaka Viti Cultural Complex in Nadi.The project, according to develop­er Grant Moreton, was close to his heart in that he aims to help keep Fiji culturally secure.Mr Moreton first came to Fiji in 1992 and fell in love with the place.Since then has set up three com­panies in Fiji – Media Metro Lim­ited which looks after all of Nadi Airport’s advertising, Premium Signcrafts which makes signage and Traveller which is an internet based tourism website.“I have been doing business for over 20 years now and mainly in ad­vertising,” he said.For the Meke Vaka Viti Cultural Complex, Mr Mereton said he had always been fascinated with Pacific culture beginning from the Maori culture in New Zealand.“Over the years I have seen Fiji lose a lot of its identity with a lot of performance being more along Polynesian.“That is not Fiji so I wanted to build a facility which was true to Fiji and be a place where that rich culture of the Fijian people was preserved.“Really tourists coming here do not see the true Fiji and that is what we will deliver here.“My working with the Fijian peo­ple is all about bringing people to­gether and working with their rich culture.”The complex was designed by Suva architectural firm Conway Begg and will have traditional bu­res, restaurant, a rara (open space) with open air performances each night.Mr Moreton said they would tar­get large cruise ships, the MICE market conference facilities and a also host conferences.“This is a significant investment but it’s one we have not taken light­ly.”The complex would be built on a piece of land, which is about four acres and situated along the Dena­rau Road just past Narewa Village.The native land belongs to three yavusas, Tukani, Botiluvuka and Nonaiqoro from Namotomoto and Navoci villagers in Nadi compris­ing between 1500 – 2000 villagers.The landowning units together run the Nakovacake Development Trust.Trust Chairman Anare Naivute­vute said special conditions have been incorporated into the lease agreement with the developer whereby the landowners would:be provided employment oppor­tunitiesbe providing all transport and shuttle servicessell their handicraft at the com­plexreceive education funds for their beneficiariesreceive community development fundsreceive 2.0 percent of gross in­comeMr Naivutevute said tourism was an important earner for Fiji and the landowners wanted to build on this.“The Government has been very good to us and assisted us through the implementing of this planned project and we want to thank the PM and his Government.”“The support from Government has made the process so much eas­ier.”The Trust’s business arm, Vanua Nakovacake Holdings Limited, al­ready have a car wash business, the rent of their building in Nadi to the Fiji Development Bank, will soon purchase four vehicles for a taxi business after receiving their LH approval from the Land Transport Authority and also a 15 acre farm where, among other things the company has ventured into mush­room planting.“We also have 40 acres of land sit­uated between Denarau Island and Fantasy Island,” he said.“We are carefully scrutinising all investors who have been making offers on proposed integrated tour­ism development for that area but have not yet decided on any.”The post $8 Million Nadi Cultural Centre appeared first on Discover the South Pacific.Source: Bloglast_img read more

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Economic sentiment indicator drops in February

first_imgThe economic sentiment indicator fell in February by 1.9 points to 114.2 mainly on deteriorating business confidence in services and retail trade and on reduced consumer confidence, the University of Cyprus said.The drop in business confidence in the service sector was mainly on more pessimistic expectations about turnover over the next three months, the Economic Research Centre (ERC) of the university said in an emailed statement on Thursday. The decrease in confidence in retail trade was on more unfavourable evaluation of inventory levels and more pessimistic expectations about sales in the coming three months.In construction and industry, business confidence improved, this month, the ERC said. The improved business confidence in construction was on better expectations about employment levels in the next three months, while in industry interviewed companies said that their evaluation of current orders was less negative. They also revised their production expectations in the next three months upwards.The drop in consumer confidence was on more pessimistic assessments of the labour market conditions and the financial situation of households over the next 12 months, the ERC added.You May LikeHeart Failure Treatment | Search AdsThe Early Signs Of Heart Failure. Search Acute Heart Failure TreatmentHeart Failure Treatment | Search AdsUndoSenior Living | Search AdsThe Cost of Senior Living in Rowland Heights Might Surprise YouSenior Living | Search AdsUndoClassmates.comLook For Any High School Yearbook, It’s FreeClassmates.comUndo Concern over falling tourism numbersUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoThe Deniz boat incident showed clearly the intentions of the Turkish sideUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

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Rep García invites students to keep reading this summer

first_img Participants in summer reading contesteligible to become ‘Rep. for a Day’As school days are winding down, state Rep. Daniela García encourages students to ramp up their reading for a chance to visit her in Lansing and be a “Rep. for a Day.”“Early literacy is vital to our children’s futures,” said Rep. García, R-Holland. “As my colleagues and I in the Legislature work with local schools to improve reading education, you can play an important role by reading to the children in your life and encouraging them to continue reading throughout the summer.”First through 5th grade students who read ten books and fill out the back of the bookmark distributed at local schools may drop it off at their local library by September 1 to be entered into a drawing. The winner and their family will be invited to Lansing to be a “Rep. for a Day” with Rep. García.“We can all help foster an early love of reading by having students participate in this reading contest,” said Rep. García. “Instilling a love of reading at a young age will pay dividends as children grow and develop.”Additional bookmarks are available at local libraries and online at RepDanielaGarcia.com. Bookmark drop-off locations include Gary Byker Memorial Library, located at 3388 Van Buren St. in Hudsonville; Howard Miller Public Library, located at 14 S. Church St. in Zeeland; and Herrick District Library, located at 300 S. River Ave. in Holland. 01Jun Rep. García invites students to keep reading this summer Categories: Garcia Newslast_img read more

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Rep Cole aids in repeal of outdated agriculture laws

first_img Categories: Cole News,Featured news,News Tags: #SB, Ag, Cole, Repeal 24Feb Rep. Cole aids in repeal of outdated agriculture lawscenter_img The Michigan House of Representatives today approved legislation to repeal outdated agricultural laws.State Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona, sponsored House Bill 5052 to repeal Public Act 340 of 1913, which prohibits the sale of unwholesome calves, pigs, and other livestock.“The definition of ‘unwholesome’ includes provisions regarding food quality and requirements for the sale of young farm animals,” said Rep. Cole. “With the approval of this legislation the state can now effectively remove outdated laws from 1913.“Michigan no longer has the power to enforce these laws. The United States Department of Agriculture now regulates rules and law concerning food safety and sale of meat for consumption. It serves no purpose to a Michigan resident to have laws that are null and void which is why I sponsored this legislation to effectively remove it.”HB 5052 now moves to the Senate for consideration.######last_img read more

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Rep Noble joins colleagues announcing top priorities

first_img16Feb Rep. Noble joins colleagues announcing top priorities Categories: News,Noble News ###center_img State Rep. Jeff Noble of Plymouth today welcomed the 2017-18 House Republican Action Plan for its emphasis on skilled-trades training, lowering taxes and helping the mentally ill.The wide-ranging plan lists top priorities over the next two years to help continue Michigan’s economic growth and improve the quality of life for residents across the state.One of Noble’s favorite initiatives is a plan to invest more in skilled-trades training for Michigan students and workers, matching them with high-demand jobs that will secure a better future.“There are good-paying jobs out there,” Noble said. “We need to offer programs to get students, workers and employers together. Give people more access to training for good jobs, and their quality of life will rise.”Noble also mentioned the effort to provide tax relief as a highlight of the action plan, along with the commitment to evaluate and improve mental health services.The 2017-18 House Republican Action Plan can be accessed on the Internet at http://gophouse.org/best-way-forward/.last_img read more

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Rep Vaupel votes to provide tax relief to Michigan families seniors

first_img Categories: News,Vaupel News Package heads to Senate for consideration State Rep. Hank Vaupel voted this week to approve a package of bills aimed at providing substantial income tax relief for families and seniors.The bills continue and increase personal exemptions for Michigan taxpayers and their dependents on their income taxes, while providing additional relief for senior citizens.Rep. Vaupel, of Fowlerville, voted for the three-bill package that will enable people to keep more of their hard-earned money.“Federal tax reform approved last month provided tax relief, but I believe we need to do more to lift the tax burden from Michigan families and senior citizens,” Vaupel said. “This is fiscally responsible and will not only improve the local economy by spurring consumer spending, it will also improve the quality of life for people in Livingston County.”The three-bill package ensures Michigan taxpayers can continue claiming personal exemptions on income taxes after federal tax reforms signed into law last month. The legislation also gradually increases the state personal exemption from the current $4,000 to $4,800 for the 2020 tax year. The legislation ensures taxpayers in Michigan cities with an income tax will continue to be able to claim exemptions in relation to the Michigan income tax, rather than the federal tax code.House Bills 5420-22 now go to the Senate for consideration.###center_img 26Jan Rep. Vaupel votes to provide tax relief to Michigan families, seniorslast_img read more

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One week away Rep Mueller to host roads town hall

first_img18Jun One week away: Rep. Mueller to host roads town hall Categories: Mueller News Today, state Rep. Mike Mueller of Linden issued a statement reminding residents of his road funding town hall on Wednesday, June 25, with special guest Rep. Jack O’Malley of Lake Ann, chair of the House Transportation Committee.“With the Legislature placing a high priority on the roads issue, it is now more important than ever to have this conversation,” Rep. Mueller said. “We are overdue for a real fix to our roads problem that does not leave out those of us in Genesee and Oakland counties. I want to hear from you on this issue, so I hope you will be able to attend this town hall.”The event will be held at the Fenton Township Hall, 12060 Mantawauka Drive in Fenton. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for registration and an opportunity to talk with Rep. Mueller and guests. The program will run from 6 to 7 p.m. with time for questions from those in attendance. There is no cost to attend.To register or for more information, please visit https://bit.ly/2MgP6r4. For questions, contact Rep. Mueller’s office by calling (517) 373-1780 or emailing MikeMueller@house.mi.gov.last_img read more

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Many Red States Are Largest Recipients of Federal Assistance

first_imgShare3TweetShareEmail3 Shares May 31, 2014; Charleston GazetteThis has been reported in different ways before, but a new report from George Washington University again points out that many “red states” that have been represented in Congress by critics of federal spending are actually the largest beneficiaries or recipients of federal money. Remember this the next time you hear Republicans representing those areas characterize Democrats as the big spenders.Paul Nyden in the Charleston Gazette writes that West Virginia gets more federal money per person than any other state in the nation. The top five states in rank order by the proportion of their incomes from federal sources are West Virginia (26.2 percent), Mississippi (24.0), Arkansas (22.8), Kentucky (22.4), and Alabama (21.8). The predominant sources of these federal funds counted in the GW analysis are Social Security, veterans’ benefits, Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, and unemployment insurance. The three largest sources by far are Social Security, Medicaid, and Medicare.North Dakota (11.8 percent), Wyoming (12.1), Colorado (12.3), Maryland (12.4), and Virginia (12.6) are the five lowest states, though the District of Columbia, were it a state as it should be, would be lower still at 11.7 percent.It shouldn’t be hard to figure out the dynamic at play: West Virginia, Mississippi, and the other high percentage recipients of federal income transfers are among the poorest states in the nation, with West Virginia tying South Carolina for the lowest per-capita income in the nation in 2012. West Virginia also has the nation’s second highest proportion of residents older than 65, thus the large volume of Social Security and Medicare income sources.While these federal sources have been significant mechanisms for reducing income disparities, policy decisions by some of these states may have exacerbated the problem, notably their decision not to expand income eligibility for Medicaid. Mississippi and Alabama are two of the 24 states that have refused to expand Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act.These anti-government states are actually significantly dependent not just on federal transfer income, but on federal grants for any number of governmental functions. WalletHub calculates West Virginia, Mississippi, Kentucky, and Alabama among the 10 states most dependent on federal government assistance, with Mississippi tied with New Mexico as the most dependent.Nonprofits have a special stake in this analysis. Nonprofits are frequently the advocates and intermediaries for federal assistance to help people in need. There may be ideological purists who somehow think their states are too dependent upon and even debilitated by federal government funding. While nonprofits in Washington have been giving wide berth to government funding as an issue as their leadership tries to keep the sector focused on saving the charitable tax deduction, they know clearly that it is governmental funding that addresses the needs of poor people in these states that won’t be rectified by the otherwise admirable generosity of America’s charitable donors. If it weren’t for federal funding, whatever income and human service difficulties residents of these states face would be much, much worse.—Rick CohenShare3TweetShareEmail3 Shareslast_img read more

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Nonprofit Compensation Self Reform at Colleges and Universities

first_imgShare4TweetShareEmail4 SharesOctober 23, 1015; Chicago TribuneAs the arguments for student loan reform and free college education take the main stage in political rhetoric, university executive compensation plans are slowly but gradually being drawn into the spotlight. At the executive level, nonprofit compensation packages include high salaries, housing packages, and such perks as retention bonuses and performance bonuses. This issue isn’t limited to just the university systems; NPQ has been reporting for the past couple of years on efforts to cap nonprofit executive pay from California to New York. Recently, though, the University of Illinois took steps that indicate they could be giving up controversy for the role of a leader in compensation reform.Timothy Killeen took over the position of president in May of this year and, according to the Chicago Tribune, committed to reform executive compensation by removing retention bonuses from administrator contracts. Killeen will start by giving up his own retention bonus of $225,000, which was scheduled to be paid out after five years on the job. (It appears his decision to do this will not negatively impact Killeen’s annual performance-based bonus of up to $100,000 or his annual salary of $600,000.)Michael Amiridis, the new chancellor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, received a compensation package that included a $50,000 per-year housing stipend. Amiridis has decided to forgo the stipend and reside fulltime in the Jonasson House, a university-owned home that was gifted to the university’s foundation and sits about one mile from campus.These are not the first compensation reduction actions by college presidents on which NPQ has reported. In 2014 two college presidents—William R. Harvey at Hampton University and Raymond Burse at Kentucky State University—took significant pay cuts in order to raise the pay of low-wage workers at the college.For-profit education already lives under scrutiny for its executive payment structures. As we watch a generation of young people crumble under the burden of student loan debt, the scrutiny of executive pay in higher education is including state and nonprofit universities. —Melissa WhatleyShare4TweetShareEmail4 Shareslast_img read more

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American Indians Achieve Voting Rights Gains

first_imgShare19Tweet29Share1Email49 SharesJanuary 4, 2018; New York Times“Fights over indigenous voting rights are playing out in the West and the Midwest, a trend that has the potential to tip tight races in states with large native populations, like Alaska and Arizona, and to influence matters of national importance, like the future of Bears Ears National Monument, a conservation area in this county that is at the center of a fierce debate over public lands,” writes Julie Turkewitz in the New York Times.Last fall, Turkewitz reports, “a federal judge ruled that San Juan County’s longtime practice of packing Navajo voters into one voting district violated the United States Constitution.” Turkewitz adds that, “The move could allow Navajo people to win two of three county commission seats for the first time, overturning more than a century of political domination by white residents.”San Juan County in Utah is home to roughly 16,000 people, roughly half of whom are white and half of whom are American Indian. The original districts created one district with 91 percent Navajo and the other two districts with around 30 percent Navajo each; the new lines would create two majority Navajo districts. The county, however, is challenging the ruling.If the ruling is upheld, the implications could be profound. As Turkewitz points out, “There are 6.6 million American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, representing about 2 percent of the population.” The 2016 Census Bureau report that Turkewitz cites identifies the five states with the highest American Indian and Alaskan Native concentrations as Alaska (19.5 percent), Oklahoma (13.6 percent), New Mexico (11.8 percent), South Dakota (10.3 percent) and Montana (8.3 percent). American Indians have a significant presence in other states as well. For example, as NPQ noted in 2016, American Indians are about five percent of voters, enough to swing elections in some communities.Given that voting rights legislation came about because of Black organizing in the US South, it is not surprising that voting rights cases have often involved Black voters. But American Indians, like Blacks, have often been blocked from voting. As Turkewitz points out, “It was not until 1924 that Congress granted native people the right to vote, and for generations afterward, local and state governments have blocked them from doing so, often saying that Native Americans living on reservations were not state residents.”The Navajo case is “part of a larger political trend of Native Americans organizing and protecting themselves,” says Daniel McCool, who, Turkewitz indicates, is “a professor emeritus at the University of Utah and a voting rights expert who was hired by the plaintiffs in the Navajo redistricting case.”Some other cases that Turkewitz highlights include:A law suit “over a new voter identification law in North Dakota, where lawyers say there is not a single driver’s license site on a reservation in a state that requires identification to vote.”In Nevada, often a swing state, “the Pyramid Lake and Walker River Paiutes won a lawsuit in late 2016 that charged that tribal citizens had to travel as many as 100 miles to vote. The suit forced officials to open new polling stations in tribal areas and spurred nine other tribes to request their own election sites.”In Alaska, “officials recently rolled out election materials in the Yup’ik, Inupiaq and Gwich’in languages, following federal rulings that found the state had failed to provide materials equivalent to those used by English speakers.”Other American Indian voting cases, notes Turkewitz, “are proceeding or have been recently settled in Arizona, Montana, South Dakota and Wyoming. And a second case is open in San Juan County, this one challenging the county’s decision to move to an all-mail ballot. Plaintiffs contend this disenfranchises native people who live far from reliable mail service.”Turkewitz notes that Wilfred Jones, the plaintiff in the case, is 62. When Jones was born, Turkewitz adds, most American Indians in Utah still could not vote. Kenny Victor, 57, a colleague of his and a Navy veteran, said he welcomed the federal judge’s order to redistrict. “I served for the right to vote. It’s long overdue. We need representation.”—Steve DubbShare19Tweet29Share1Email49 Shareslast_img read more

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Russian deputy minister of communications Aleksand

first_imgRussian deputy minister of communications Aleksandr Zharov has been named as the new head of media and telecommunications regulator Roskomnadzor, according to local reports.Zharov will replace Oleg Ivanov, the temporary head of the agency since previous head Sergei Sitnikov was appointed governor of the Kostroma region of Russia at the end of April.last_img

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UK pay TV operator BSkyB increased its reach by an

first_imgUK pay TV operator BSkyB increased its reach by an additional 312,000 households in the 12 months ending June 30, reaching a total of 10.6 million subscribers. Growth has slowed, however, from the 426,000 new customers reported during the previous year.Announcing is full year results, the incumbent operator said it had the country’s largest and fastest-growing triple-play customer base, with 3.4 million subs taking three services, up 21% year-on-year. Customers now take an average of 2.7 products each, up from 2.5 last year.The operator ended June with 10,288,000 TV subscribers having added 101,000 during the year. The number of HD customers increased by half a million to 4.3 million, while Sky’s multiroom service is now in 2.4 million homes, an increase of 152,000.The operator added 138,000 broadband customers during the year, ending June with a total of four million. It also announced that it would roll out Sky Broadband and telephony services in Ireland, making them available to 1.6 million homes.Revenues for the full year were up 4.5% on a like-for-like basis to £6.791 billion (€8.7 billion), while EBIDTA was up 3% to £1.567 billion.Sky’s CEO, Jeremy Darroch, said, “In what remains a tough economic environment, customers are choosing Sky over other providers. We’ve continued to add new households and existing customers are remaining loyal and taking more products from us. More than nine million homes are now choosing to watch their TV through Sky Plus, we’re helping more customers to save money in home communications and innovative services like Sky Go are adding even more value to their subscription.”last_img read more

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Overthetop TV streaming device provider Roku has

Over-the-top TV streaming device provider Roku has updated its app to enable users to stream music playlists and photos from iPhones and Android devices to the TV.The new Play on Roku feature also offers improved device discovery, the ability to launch channels using voice commands on Android devices and the option to give unique names to multiple Roku players. The app is available in the UK, Ireland and Canada.Play on Roku works with all Roku 2 models, the current-generation Roku HD player, and Roku LT and will be compatible with the upcoming Roku Streaming Stick. read more

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The Open IPTV Forum has added set top box vendor A

first_imgThe Open IPTV Forum has added set top box vendor ABox42, application developer Axonista, testing businesses BluFocus and Digital TV Labs, and technology companies DCC Labs and mistserver.org as new members, taking the total number of new members to the organisation over the last six months to 18.The Forum, which promotes interoperable specifications, said that the new companies would increase the breadth of industry support for its open specifications for connected TV services and devices. Nilo Mitra, The Open IPTV Forum’s president, announced the new members in advance of the organisation’s forthcoming plenary, to be hosted by Sony in Tokyo, Japan.last_img read more

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Ericsson will exhibit at ANGA COM at stand V11 H

first_imgEricsson will exhibit at ANGA COM at stand V.11, Hall 10.1. Ericsson will demo its new high performance compression platform the AVP 4000 at ANGA COM. Initially launched at NAB earlier this year, the AVP 4000 is designed to offer efficiency and flexibility in the delivery of TV services by addressing multiple applications, regardless of codec, resolution or network.It is powered by Ericsson’s first professional video chip, which combines 20 years of compression algorithms development and a software programmable platform to respond to the needs of the cable market, Ericsson said.The AVP 4000 offers the highest performance MPEG-2 SD and HD encoding and can be upgraded to support MPEG-4 SD/HD, up to 4:2:2 10-bit, and JPEG 2000.“In a multi-screen TV world, MSOs need to respond to the changes in consumer demand by providing new and better services, faster than ever before,” said Ericsson.“Competition has increased from both traditional TV service providers and new entrants, often utilising their high-speed data networks. The main challenge for cable operators is to differentiate their services and increase multi-screen reach within the bandwidth constraints of their existing infrastructure.”Ericsson will also use ANGA to present its single-platform Media Delivery Network, multi-screen user interfaces for TV Anywhere experiences and will offer live demos of MPEG-DASH adaptive streaming and Ultra High Definition TV.last_img read more

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Technology companies SeaWell and Arris have develo

first_imgTechnology companies SeaWell and Arris have developed an integrated advertising solution for multiscreen.The solution integrates SeaWell’s Spectrum IP session delivery controller technology into the SkyVision ad insertion platform developed by Arris.According to the pair, the joint solution provides dynamic format repackaging, per-session content management and analytics, zone-based, localised and targeted ad insertion, blackout management and programme substitution and support across all major adaptive bit-rate protocols.SeaWell is a clear market leader for targeted ad insertion on multiscreen devices, with global deployments among tier-one operators,” said Neerav Shah, vice-president and general manager, multiscreen video infrastructure, cloud business solutions, Arris. “This makes SeaWell a perfect complement to our leading portfolio of end-to-end multiscreen and advertising solutions. By integrating Spectrum into our SkyVision platform, Arris is not only enabling operators’ multiscreen shift to IP, but also offering the most powerful advertising solutions for this next-generation of TV.”last_img read more

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