first_imgVince Caponi, CEO of St. Vincent Health in Indianapolis and former trustee of Saint Mary’s College, spoke to Saint Mary’s students in a self-described “true David Letterman fashion” talk called “The Top 10 Rules to Live By.” The College’s “Cross Currents” program sponsored this talk as part of its ongoing Collegiate Speaker Series. Using anecdotal framework from his experiences with his daughters, Caponi addressed students with advice on how to approach the business world after graduation. Introducing his “top 10,” He told students that they should consider three things as they go through college and enter the business world. “In order to be a good student, person, employee, there are three things we all want from our experiences: you want to be in on the things that affect you, you want recognition for a job well done, you want to know what you do makes a difference in people’s lives and have a very clear sight of what role you play,” Caponi said. He followed with his top 10 rules to live by. Caponi said his first two rules, humility and gratitude, were underrated traits of real leaders. Going into the business world, he said, someone would take a chance on you because you have no experience, and it is important to demonstrate your thanks for the opportunities you are given. His third rule was about ethics. “The ethical part is your handshake; it is your honor,” Caponi said. “It’s something only you have and you are the only one who can make that positive of negative.” The fourth rule was to have a sense of humor, which is important because you have to learn to laugh at yourself. Caponi said laughter can help relieve tensions in a lot of difficult situations. Caponi also said that everyone should have a “can-do, positive attitude.” He told students to remain positive, especially when first entering the career world. “There are people that walk around with a cloud over their heads, but that will get you nowhere,” Caponi said. “When you apply for jobs, there are going to be a lot of people who are going to tell you that you can’t do it, but you have to remember that you are a gift from God and that you have a unique talent.” Sixth on Caponi’s list was to love where you are. He said that if one does not receive their ideal position in the company, take advantage of the opportunity because situations tend to work out in the end. As a seventh rule, Caponi said he would advise everyone to try and learn something new everyday. Learning new things, especially details about people, can break down the walls that divide us and allow us to start building relationships. His advice was to learn from outlets that you don’t necessarily agree with. The eighth rule was to communicate often and clearly. Caponi stressed the importance of communication, both verbal and physical communication. “In terms of jobs, communication is very important,” Caponi said. “It’s really important that you do it clearly, understandably and often.” The ninth rule to live by, according to Caponi, was to remember that there are two sides to every story. Keeping this in mind, Caponi said, do not rush to judgment and give people the benefit of the doubt. He also said that it is important to explore, probe and to find out the truth in these situations. Caponi’s culminated his top 10 list with a rule that he said was probably the most important of the 10 — volunteer. He said location isn’t an excuse, because there is always an opportunity to spend time giving of yourself to others. “My advice to you is do what you do, and love what it is that you do,” Caponi said.last_img read more

first_imgAs the Indiana State Excise Police continue their Intensified College Enforcement (ICE) initiative in South Bend, their officers made more than 14 times as many arrests during the Michigan game weekend than the first home football weekend against Purdue. Excise officers arrested 72 individuals on 99 charges Friday and Saturday, according to a press release issued by public information officer Corporal Travis Thickstun this week. The officers arrested five people on nine charges during the home football game against Purdue on Sept. 8. On Friday, excise officers arrested 31 people on 46 charges, the release stated. Those arrests included 18 adults who were furnishing alcohol to a minor. During tailgating around campus Saturday, officers arrested 41 people on 53 charges. Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) also reported seven arrests on various charges in the Stadium on Saturday. The majority of the individuals charged by the Excise Police were minors for illegal consumption or possession of alcohol, the release stated. Eight of those 45 individuals charged were less than 18 years old. “Excise officers also cited six minors for possession of false ID,” the release stated. “Two people were arrested for public intoxication, two for resisting law enforcement and one on a drug-related charge.” Other citations included juvenile in possession of tobacco, disorderly conduct, false informing, false government ID and various traffic violations. Student body president Brett Rocheleau said students should be honest and respectful if approached by a police officer. “If anyone gets approached by a police officer, please be respectful and comply,” Rocheleau said. “I know there are some instances where people got tickets for refusing to cooperate or handing over a fake ID.” Student government hosted a safety summit with local and state police officers at the beginning of the school year to inform students about how to interact with law enforcement. Officers from the Excise Police were present at that summit. Rocheleau said he also sent emails to the student body to advise them on staying safe off campus and during game weekends. “From the different stories we heard about the ICE program that they had enacted [at Notre Dame] and seeing that [Indiana University] and [Purdue University] had also been visited by Excise Police, I anticipated them coming to campus, which is why we tried to sort of warn the student body by sending out the emails to every student if they’re underage to watch out for the Excise Police, to make sure they’re being responsible and safe … [and] informing students that if they are underage they should not be consuming alcohol,” he said. The release from Thickstun cited several instances of students who were uncooperative when dealing with excise officers. Thickstun could not be reached for further comment on the weekend’s arrests. “A male juvenile ran from officers as they were speaking with a group of people in the tailgate lots,” the release stated. “He was caught and found to have a [blood alcohol content] of .07 percent. He was cited and was released to his mother after she was cited for furnishing alcohol to a minor. “Another male was arrested after giving a false Pennsylvania driver’s license and other false information to officers. He had a [blood alcohol content] of .16 percent and will face charges for illegal consumption, false informing and possession of false ID.” Rocheleau said Excise officers do not always book individuals into jail when they make arrests. Rather, they issue drinking tickets and citations, though they can issue multiple charges at one time for different offenses. “Excise uses the word ‘arrest’ in terms of a ticket,” Rocheleau said. “While there could have been students incarcerated … a lot of it depends on the circumstances and how the student has been interacting with police.” Indiana State Excise Police, a division of the Indiana Alcohol and Tobacco Commission, added Notre Dame to their ICE initiative this year. The new program targets college campuses to reduce underage drinking, and Excise officers also have a presence at five other universities in the state, including Butler University, Indiana University and Purdue University. Rocheleau said the Excise officers will continue to have a presence in the South Bend area, even during the upcoming bye weekend and away game weekends. “They are focused on liquor stores as well as bars,” he said. “They want to make sure that no one underage is going into liquor stores and bars on non-football weekends.” While excise police have upped the number of arrests in the area and reported evasive student behavior during tailgating, Rocheleau said he has heard of only positive interactions between students and South Bend Police Department and St. Joseph County Police Department officers. He encouraged any students with complaints about treatment from police to contact him directly. Rocheleau meets with representatives from those local law enforcement agencies and Excise Police three times each year. “Their message is basically if you’re under the age of 21, you should not be consuming alcohol, going into liquor stores or going into bars,” he said.last_img read more

first_imgDistance, steep ticket prices and a potentially hostile environment were not enough to keep some devoted fans from planning a trip to Norman this Saturday to witness a top-10 football clash between the Oklahoma Sooners and the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. Junior Peter Roemholdt said he is willing to endure the 30-hour roundtrip drive from South Bend in order to experience the renowned atmosphere at Oklahoma’s Gaylord Family Memorial Stadium. “The atmosphere is going to be electric,” Roehmholdt said. “I bet it’s going to be extremely loud, and especially if it’s a close game, it should be quite the experience.” Junior John Garry, who is traveling as part of the Notre Dame Marching Band, said he also is excited to support the team and be there for one of the most important games since the 2005 Notre Dame-USC showdown. Despite having to leave on Thursday and drive through the night, Garry said being a part of this game is still more than worth it. “It’s going to be rowdy, it’s going to be crazy,” Garry said. “[ESPN’s] ‘College Gameday’ will be there, so take what happened on our campus and multiply it. It should be a good day to be a college football fan.” Roehmholdt said he is also looking forward to getting a taste of the Oklahoma tailgating culture before the game. “The tailgating will be great,” Roehmholdt said. “A lot of these big schools pride themselves on their tailgates and pregame parties almost more than being at the game itself.” Garry said band members won’t have much time for activities before the game, occupied by a pep rally and with preparation for their halftime performance. “Basically we’re just there to be at the game,” Garry said. “Performing will be fun. Oklahoma fans are some of the rowdiest in the nation, so it will be great to get out there and be on the field for that.” Despite being behind enemy lines as a Notre Dame supporter, Roehmholdt said he is not concerned about having to deal with potentially abusive or belligerent Oklahoma fans. “It’s an 8:00 [p.m.] game, people will have been tailgating for a while so I’m sure there will be some rowdy individuals, but it will be fine,” Roehmholdt said. “I can handle a few ‘Notre Dame sucks.’” Garry said he expects the crowd environment to be intense due to the implications of the game, yet not as hostile as the atmosphere of Michigan. “The Notre Dame-Oklahoma rivalry isn’t quite as heated as other rivalries, and Sooner fans are known for being incredibly courteous outside the stadium,” Garry said. “Once you get inside the stadium, it will be a different story. Overall, Roehmholdt said he anticipates the trip will be one of the highlights of his time at Notre Dame. “At the end of the day you’re not going to remember the homework and the tests, you’re going to remember the experiences you had at Oklahoma for the biggest game in Notre Dame history for a long time,” Roehmholdt said. Contact Dan Brombach at dbrombac@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgSaint Mary’s director of media relations Gwen O’Brien encouraged students to join the community in launching Faith Always, Action Now, the capital campaign that seeks to raise $80 million for scholarships, professorships, selected facility improvements and other projects, for the College. The reception will be held at 6 p.m. Friday in the O’Laughlin Auditorium lobby, hosting members of the community before the campaign launch event, which begins at 7 p.m.   “This event is not something to miss,” O’Brien said. “The reception and launch event will definitely excite students about Saint Mary’s and its future with this campaign.” Alumna Lindsey Anderson, a professional opera singer, is currently on campus to act as the storyteller for the evening, student body president Maureen Parsons said.   “Current students will be sharing their Saint Mary›s story and there will be video throughout as well,” she said. “The program is emotional and touching, and I think will be something students who attend will never forget.” Students are also encouraged to attend the Heritage Week dinner, which begins tonight at 5:15 p.m. Special guest speakers include board chair Mary L. Burke, a 1985 alumna, and Sister Veronique Wiedower, a 1970 graduate of the College.”The Heritage Week dinner is an annual event we have during this week each year.  This year it is a little different because of the capital campaign launch,” Parsons said. “Mary Burke is going to speak to the students about what the capital campaign is, what we are raising money for and why it is important for current students.” As a senior, Parsons knows she and her peers may never see the changes while students but said students must remember that “the renovations and new buildings we have currently are because of past alumnae investing in the College as well.”  Also part of the campaign she and her peers may never see the changes while students, but said students must remember that “the renovations and new buildings we have currently are because of past alumnae investing in the College as well.” Also part of the campaign launch festivities was a faculty luncheon hosted by College President Carol Ann Mooney on Wednesday afternoon that awarded two faculty members for their excellence at the College.  “These awards, made possible by the generosity of two alumnae and their spouses, recognize faculty members who are deeply dedicated to their students, their scholarship, and their communities,” a College press releasee said.  Mary Ann Merryman, professor of business and accounting, was presented The Donald R. and Nora Barry Fischer Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence. This award, named for the 1973 graduates of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, respectively, recognizes excellence in discipline-specific teaching by a faculty member in upper-division courses in a major, the press release said.  “In addition to her typical teaching responsibilities, over the past nine years, Merryman has organized and coached a team of four to compete in the INCPAS Case Competition, competing against teams from colleges and universities across Indiana,” the press release said. “Merryman has led Saint Mary’s teams to the final six for seven of the last eight years with the teams finishing first in 2010 and 2011.” Merryman is a certified public accountant account who received her Bachelor of Science from Manchester College and her Master of Science in Accountancy from Notre Dame. Jayne Kendle, associate professor of nursing, was presented with The Kevin J. and Marijo Rogers Kelly Service Award, named for the 1977 graduates of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, respectively. This award recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates exceptional commitment to local, regional, nationa, or international service to his or her academic field, according to the press release.  “Kendle has expanded her service role to include serving as a Board member of the O’Hana Heritage Foundation helping to establish A Rosie Place, a specialty care hospital for medically fragile children,” the press release said. “She continues to work to educate Indiana legislators and work with the State Department of Public Health to secure funds to support these families.” Kendle received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Evansville and has a Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Missouri.last_img read more

first_imgFor a small number of Notre Dame students, taking classes at Saint Mary’s is a normal part of their daily schedule. Junior John Brahier, who is majoring in mathematics at Notre Dame and pursuing a secondary education minor at Saint Mary’s, said he has taken several required courses for his minor at Saint Mary’s. “I’ve taken a number of classes at SMC, all part of my secondary education major,” Brahier said. “SMC has the education program I was looking for, so when I graduate, the plan is that I’ll have both the secondary education minor and a license to teach.” Junior Madeline Swan, who is a math and sociology double major, also has a secondary education minor at Saint Mary’s.  Swan said the small class sizes, good learning environments, and caring professors are instrumental to her success at Saint Mary’s. Her experience at Saint Mary’s has helped her move past common prejudices held between female students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s, Swan said. “The professors have been awesome and I have met some truly great classmates,” Swan said. “Also, this has helped me break down stereotype barriers for me that are typically present between SMC and ND girls.” Brahier said it was initially difficult to be the only male in many of his Saint Mary’s courses, but the transition has gotten easier with time. “It was a big difference for me at first because I came from an all-guys high school, so to go to classes of almost all girls was a pretty big change,” he said. “Obviously there was a bit of an adjustment period at first, but it’s not really a big deal in the long-run.” Brahier said his decision to enroll at Saint Mary’s was due to Notre Dame not offering the education training he wanted. “My plan after graduation is to teach math in a high school, but Notre Dame doesn’t have an Education Department that directly prepares students to be teachers and helps with the licensing process,” he said. Brahier said taking courses through the education department at Saint Mary’s has been a positive experience and his professors take an interest in student success. “The Education Department at SMC has sponsored some really cool events related to social justice in education and is a big proponent of service-learning,” Brahier said. “By and large, the faculty I’ve worked with at SMC have been great – they seem to really care about each student and want us to do our best. In general, I think that’s definitely true at Notre Dame as well.” Notre Dame students enrolled in Saint Mary’s classes are assigned a Saint Mary’s advisor in addition to their advisor at Notre Dame, Brahier said. His Saint Mary’s helps him choose his courses and build his schedule, he said.  Brahier said he works with his two advisors separately. “If I have a question about education classes, I have to go to the SMC advisor,” he said. “For math or theology, I go to my advisor from each of those departments at ND.” He said his courses at Saint Mary’s are determined by his major requirements, so he meets with his Saint Mary’s advisor regularly and registers for courses in person. “Registration for my classes at SMC is relatively straightforward because I have a pretty set list of classes that I have to take, so basically I just meet with my advisor over there on a regular basis to make sure I stay on track from semester to semester,” Brahier said. “I don’t do any online registration for those classes – instead, it’s all through contact with my advisor.” Swan said she feels fortunate to have the opportunity to study at both institutions. “I’ve discovered how lucky I am to get the change to participate in such a great education program as an ND student as well as collaborate and learn from some great Saint Mary’s students,” she said. Brahier said the combination of classes from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s has also been rewarding for him. “Both schools definitely are focused on their identities as Catholic schools, and both schools have a sense of purpose and mission,” he said. “My favorite part of the secondary education minor at SMC has been getting to work with the faculty that is so passionate about preparing us to be great teachers. Their staff is dedicated and wants us to do our best, and studying in that incredibly positive atmosphere has been very rewarding.”last_img read more

first_imgBy NICOLE McALEE News Writer Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said. Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI.  The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,00s, and last year, it raised more than $6,00s, according to Ryad.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing teamebelievesyit can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an o-line giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edu,Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said.  Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI. The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,000, and last year, it raised more than $6,000, according to Ryan.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing team believes it can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an online giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgA burglary occurred at a student residence in the 400 block of N. Frances Street last week, according to an email from the Off Campus Council sent Saturday. The email stated that the crime took place between 3 p.m. on Nov. 26 and 2 p.m. Dec. 1. The burglar gained entry by unknown means, there were no signs of force and the house’s rear door was found unlocked.   Two flat screen televisions, an Xbox 360, an unknown amount of U. S. currency and an iPad mini were taken, the email stated. Suspect information is not available. For more information on crime prevention and ways to reduce the risk of crime, the Off Campus Council said students should visit the Notre Dame Security Police website or consult the live crime map of Notre Dame, South Bend and Mishawaka available at www.crimereports.comlast_img read more

first_imgIn order to fight misconceptions about the Muslim faith and educate people about specific aspects of Islam, the Notre Dame Muslim Students Association (MSA-ND) is hosting its first Islam Awareness Week from Tuesday to Friday of this week.S.M. Moududul Islam, MSA-ND secretary, said the organization began planning the week last semester, using other universities’ Islam Awareness Weeks as models.He said the goal of the week, which is funded by a Graduate Student Life grant, Campus Ministry, the Islamic Society of Michiana South Bend Mosque, the Center for Social Concerns and the Kroc Institute for International Studies, is to provide a series of unified events that allow the Notre Dame community to ask detailed questions about the Muslim faith.“The idea of Islam Awareness Week is to have multiple events within a week so that we can draw the attention of the people here on campus and let them know about Islam, and also to let the people ask questions,” Islam said. “We are having different talks and different … events at which there can be close interaction between the audience and the speaker. It is good to have that forum where you can ask questions.”MSA-ND vice president Md. Itrat Bin Shams said the week would also be an opportunity to learn about certain facets of Islam, such as the pilgrimage to Mecca and the concept of the hijab, in more detail.“[The goal is] to let people know about specific aspects of Islam, some things that are maybe known to us but not to people who believe in other faiths,” Shams said.The week will begin with two events focused on Hajj, the fifth Pillar of Islam, in which Muslims make a pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca. On Tuesday, there will be a screening of the documentary, “Seven Wonders of the Muslim World,” which features seven mosques in the Islamic world and tells the story of seven pilgrims’ journey to Mecca.On Wednesday, during Campus Ministry’s regular “Prayer from Around the World,” Dr. A. Rashied Omar, a research scholar of Islamic Studies and peace building at the Kroc Institute, will give a talk on Hajj.“We always see the image of the Kaaba in Mecca on TV, but we don’t exactly know any people who are non-Muslim who know what is going on there,” Islam said.“So the idea is to have a lecture, and in addition to the lecture we are having a video demonstration on the pilgrimage to Mecca … [Dr. A. Rashied Omar] will be discussing the spiritual aspect as well as the rituals.”Directly following Omar’s lecture will be a dinner titled “I Believe In . . .” which will consist of small-group discussions of each participant’s faith.On Friday, MSA-ND will provide transportation for 12 students to the mosque at the Islamic Society of Michiana for a prayer service.“Some students from Notre Dame can come with us to see how we perform our prayer and also, there’s a speech just before the prayer by the imam, the leader in the mosque,” Shams said. “They can see the whole picture. The mosque, for us, for Muslims, is not only the place for the prayer, [but] it is [also] a community center, so they can see how these things connect with each other.”The week will culminate with a lecture by Hisham Mahmoud, an instructor of Arabic at Harvard University and prominent scholar of Islam on Friday evening. Mahmoud will discuss the importance of Jesus and Mary in the Islamic tradition.Tags: dr. a. rashied omar, hisham mahmoud, Islam, islam awareness week, islamic society of michiana, kroc institute for international studies, mosque, MSA-ND, muslim faith, muslim students association, notre dame muslim students association, SM Moududal Islamlast_img read more

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Jill Hobgood “Just when you thought we were a sleepy little college, think again,” says Jill Hobgood, marketing and outreach librarian at Saint Mary’s College.Hobgood, along with circulation librarian Lisa Karle, reference librarian Ula Gaha and College archivist John Kovach, spearheaded the latest exhibition at the Cushwa-Leighton Library, “Saint Mary’s Case Files: Strange but True People and Events,” which will run through Dec. 10.The exhibition displays original research by the investigative team with featured stories from the Saint Mary’s newspaper archives, Hobgood said. The exhibit follows an exhibition on Sr. Madeleva Wolff, the College’s third president, who was honored with a four-part lecture series, “Madeleva Mondays,” at the Library during the months of September and October in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Sr. Madeleva’s death.In conjunction with the current exhibition, the library will also host “Library Mystery Night” on Dec. 5 with prizes and refreshments for student teams.“Some people just associate mystery nights with someone dressing up and pretending to be murdered, but ours aren’t really like that,” Hobgood said. “It’s more putting together a story and solving  an overall question by finding clues all over the library. The library is closed, so we’re the only ones in here. If you’ve ever wanted to run and yell in the library, this is a good opportunity.The current exhibition began as an idea by the librarians and Kovach after they discovered odd headlines in the newspaper archives, Kovach said.“When you are hunting around and go to the sources where you think something will show up and you find out it doesn’t, the next thing you want to do is ask yourself, ‘Whats the real story here?” Kovach said.The first story featured in the exhibit was found when Hobgood and Kovach were hunting for something completely different, but stumbled across an enticing headline in an 1892 newspaper, Hobgood said.“In the newspaper, I found this article that this woman named Lillie Johnson was recently coming home from the school that she was attending, this so-called convent school in South Bend, Indiana,” Hobgood said. “I thought, I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that this school must be Saint Mary’s.“So this turned out to be quite an infamous story. Lillie was coming home from college only after playing a major part in assisting a murderer, even though she wasn’t the murderer of the victim. She drove the getaway buggy.”The second featured part of the exhibit displays the case of Aline Ellis, who was a graduate in 1899 and attended Saint Mary’s along with her younger sister.“After graduating, in 1902, she married a Notre Dame professor, who was head of the English department for over fifteen years,” Hobgood said. “Within a month, he was poisoned after eating a bad can of ham, and Aline was rather spectacularly arrested in Philadelphia for being the perpetrator.“There were headlines for weeks and weeks, wondering if she poisoned him, if he was dying, if she was running off with this other guy, if she pawned the family jewels. It was really sensational.”Because Ellis’ story is so complex and yet to be solved, Hobgood said the Library staff chose her as a subject of the “Library Mystery Night.”“We’ve done serial killers, thefts and more,” Hobgood said. “This one on Aline Ellis is really cool, since her story has so many twists and turns. Supposedly, when Aline went to the store and purchased this can of ham, she specifically said to the clerk, ‘I don’t suppose it’s poisoned, is it?’ There’s a lot to this story, and we’re excited to explore it with the students.”Kovach said another interesting part of doing this sort of archival research and display is deciphering the truth of the content.“In a lot of these eras, what you’ll find is that the newspaper articles are not exactly bylined,” Kovach said. “So you don’t know where any of these people are getting any of their information. It’s more about what is going to sell the newspaper back then.”“One day, a newspaper will be saying something absolutely happened, and then another newspaper a few days later will say this report is completely untrue,” Hobgood said. “So you have to go and read a lot of it to get an idea of what really went on.”Another feature of the exhibit is the mystery of the disappearance of two famous sculptures on campus of stone dogs, Hobgood said.“The dog statues turn up in album after album of past students, and there are poems and stories in the College’s literary magazine ‘Chimes’ about them, and then one day, after a certain year in the 1900s, there is nothing,” Hobgood said.Kovach said the disappearance of the statues is shocking, as the figures were features of many student scrapbooks that he has studied, including that of Mary McCandless, an alumna and namesake of one of the College’s dorms.“So … these two dogs are here until the 1920s, and I can’t imagine if after that year, that the students who know of the dogs wouldn’t mention them being gone,” Kovach said. “They are a large size and are stone. A couple of students actually called the dogs the ‘end of the road’ or the ‘end of the line,’ as they were boundary dogs for the campus, in a way.”Though Halloween may be over, Hobgood said the exhibit keeps up the spirit of mystery and hair-raising eeriness.“Some of these things we found were just little bits and pieces, and we got to flesh them out into these big mystery stories,” Hobgood said. “This was the most fun exhibit ever.”The exhibit is at Saint Mary’s Cushwa-Leighton Library in the front lobby now through Dec. 10. Students can sign up for the “Library Mystery Night” near the exhibit.last_img read more

first_imgThe Notre Dame community will celebrate its Catholic tradition and Latin American ties by hosting Las Posadas from Dec. 2-4 at 9 p.m. The celebration, whose Spanish title translates to “lodging,” represents Mary and Joseph’s search for shelter before Jesus’ birth. This year, Las Posadas begins at The Grotto and ends in Keenan Hall, Farley Hall and the Coleman-Morse Center on each of the three respective nights.Multiple student organizations on campus including Campus Ministry, Coro Primavera and the Latino Student Alliance worked in tandem to plan and generate participation in this year’s Las Posadas, Farley Hall rector and Las Posadas organizer Elaine DeBassige said.“To see the diverse ways of how we come together as a spiritual community is really important,” DeBassige said. “We also have to remember to be like Christ in the season of Advent and have our hearts and doors open to all those who need a place of shelter.”DeBassige said the celebration brought back memories of her childhood in New Mexico.“Back in my hometown, it ended at midnight mass in the church and took place in 11 other houses,” she said.DeBassige said her mom volunteered her family’s house to be one of the destinations for Las Posadas in their small village every year.DeBassige said she too helps designate the path Las Posadas celebrants will follow through the University’s campus. She said Keenan Hall was a logical host of one of the nights because it is Farley’s brother dorm.“Last year the path from The Grotto to the two dorms worked really well,” DeBassige said. “What’s different this year is that we are ending at Campus Ministry.”DeBassige said that, although she was not disappointed with last year’s turn out, she hopes an increase in club involvement will translate to an increase in student attendance.“Last year, there were a total of about 150 people over the three nights which was great,” DeBassige said. “It was more than what I thought.”DeBassige said she anticipates a large turnout this year due to better publicity and relatively tamer weather.“I think it’s a good way to represent Catholic traditions and culture in a way that involves a lot more people than just Latinos,” Juan Rangel, multicultural senior intern for Campus Ministry, said.Members of the Notre Dame community will sing hymns, pray and eat food during Las Posadas in order to celebrate this journey.“Prayer and music and reflection demonstrates the colorfulness of the culture,” Rangel said.DeBassige said aside from prayers and songs of worship, Las Posadas incorporates a social element. The event provides opportunities to socialize over food and beverages served by the host location.“My favorite part growing up was helping my mom make the food for the event,” DeBassige said. “It was a time to welcome people into your home … and a time of hospitality.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Coro Primavera, Farley Hall, Keenan Hall, Las Posadas, Latino Student Alliancelast_img read more