first_imgBy NICOLE McALEE News Writer Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said. Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI.  The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,00s, and last year, it raised more than $6,00s, according to Ryad.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing teamebelievesyit can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an o-line giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edu,Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said.  Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI. The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,000, and last year, it raised more than $6,000, according to Ryan.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing team believes it can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an online giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgUniversity of Georgia food scientist Anand Mohan says attending his two-day workshop will help those deciding whether or not to start a new food business to come to a decision.“At the end of the class, most graduates determine they have two options: they either say, ‘No, a new food business is not for me’ or ‘Yes, I can work it out and get my product to market,’” he said.The “Starting a New Food Business” workshop will be Oct. 6-7 from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. The cost is $150 and includes instructional materials, lunch both days and refreshments.The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has previously offered the course as a one-day training. To encourage more participation and to meet new food company owners’ needs, Mohan has “revamped” the workshop.“It is now two, full days, and we cover a broad range of topics, from regulations, to food safety, to product development, marketing and choosing a co-packer or shared kitchen,” he said. As a result of the UGA workshop, 25 to 30 new food products have been launched in the past two years. The class is designed for Georgians, but typically attracts participants from Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee, he said. In addition to the breadth of material covered, participants will benefit from the expertise of the instructors. UGA faculty and representatives from the Georgia Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will lead the workshop. “Top-of-the-line faculty will be teaching the course in a commercial kitchen,” Mohan said. “In the last three workshops, we had a chef demo with a Food Network chef, and the UGA Small Business Development Center did a session on business plans. It’s really a team effort.”The workshop includes hands-on demonstrations and a tour of the UGA Food Product Innovation and Commercialization Center (Food PIC) in Griffin. Newly named Food PIC Director Kirk Kealey will also lead sessions. Kealey spent the last 30 years helping to develop and launch products like Mountain Dew, Tropicana juices and Dove Chocolate. Now he’ll do the same for small and large food businesses in Georgia and across the Southeast through UGA’s Food PIC. The center is designed to help new food business owners with product development, packaging, food safety, consumer acceptance and marketing.“This workshop is so popular because we give participants one-on-one attention and allow them time to network together. And the final day includes a two-hour panel discussion when they can ask any questions they still have,” said Mohan.Participants are encouraged to bring samples of their own food products for tasting on the final day of the workshop.Mohan calls the second day of the workshop the “high energy day.” “By this time, they all know they have the same problems and the same dreams, and they are beginning to open up to one another,” he said. The new food business workshop has also been offered in Tifton and Savannah, Georgia, and future sessions have been requested for the Albany, Georgia, area and Atlanta. “We have more demand for the class than we can fulfill,” he said.Register for the workshop online at https://estore.uga.edu/C27063_ustores/web/store_cat.jsp?STOREID=42&CATID=205. For more information on other UGA food science Cooperative Extension courses, see the calendar at http://efsonline.uga.edu or call (706) 542-2574.last_img read more

first_imgDear Editor,Today I attended the official launch of United Nations World Inter-Faith Harmony Week 2019 at the National Cultural Centre. This annual activity which began since the passage of the UN resolution has been hosted by the Inter-Religious Organisation (IRO) of Guyana in collaboration with the Government of Guyana. This has been so for many years under the PPP/C and now under this coalition Government. This event has always been a forum where diversity is recognised, celebrated and respected.There has been a significant departure over the last three years. Historically, all the faiths of Guyana are invited to participate, both in offering prayers and to bring messages from their various holy books and texts. On the program of this event, this year, the Christian community was excluded from bringing a message. I sat next to two Bishops from the Christian faith; neither of them knew the reason why. At the end of the program, I enquired from several members of the executive committee of the IRO and none could give a plausible explanation, except that they confirmed that it was a decision by the Ministry of the Presidency.Further, every year, the UN resident coordinator would bring a message from the UN Secretary General. The President of Guyana and Leader of the parliamentary Opposition would also be asked to bring messages. Since this coalition Government has been in office the program in previous years was expanded to include messages from the PNC, APNU and AFC. I spoke to several members of the IRO about this unhealthy development a few years ago. This year’s program they have excluded a message from the parliamentary Opposition while having a speaker from the Government. When I enquired why the parliamentary Opposition was not on the program, it was reported that this was a decision of the Ministry of the Presidency.These actions have caused me to conclude the following: this action of exclusion determined by the Ministry of the Presidency Department of Social Cohesion makes the case that the Government’s rhetoric about social cohesion and national unity is a farce and purely for propaganda purposes. Secondly, the Ministry of the Presidency Department of the Social Cohesion has hijacked the functions of the IRO.Editor, not because this activity is funded by the Government means they have any right to dictate the exclusion of one of Guyana’s major religions, namely the Christian faith and the further exclusion of the parliamentary Opposition which currently holds 32 seats in the National Assembly. This action further crystallises the lack of sincerity on the part of the political directorate, they are prepared to speak about social cohesion while at the same time locking out the voices and views of those who don’t fall into their political camp.Silence on my part would be tantamount to condoning the hijacking of this reputable religious organisation of which I am a co-founder and it would also mean that I give consent to the abuse of this intended harmony event to promote partisan behaviour.We need to do better than this!Yours truly,Bishop Juan A Edghilllast_img read more