first_imgBy NICOLE McALEE News Writer Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said. Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI.  The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,00s, and last year, it raised more than $6,00s, according to Ryad.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing teamebelievesyit can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an o-line giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edu,Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said.  Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI. The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,000, and last year, it raised more than $6,000, according to Ryan.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing team believes it can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an online giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgA member of Indonesian Young Scientists Forum (IYSF) has lauded President Joko “Jokowi” Wibowo for imposing a social distancing policy to stem the spread of COVID-19, but has urged the government to take a stricter stance by canceling mudik (exodus) this year.Mudik is the annual exodus that occurs during the Ramadan-Idul Fitri holiday season, when people head to their hometowns across the country to celebrate Idul Fitri with their families. At least 1.2 million cars left Jakarta for mudik 2019, headed primarily to provinces on Java and Sumatra.IYSF member Berry Juliandi from IPB University said that the social distancing policy showed the government’s openness to suggestions from scientists. The policy implements distance learning for all schools and universities, restricts public gatherings and advises everyone to stay at home and avoid all but urgent travel as the government increased its prevention measures against the outbreak in Indonesia, which is home to about 270 million people. .One thing left off the discussion table, however, was whether or not to scrap mudik, Berry noted.”We are talking about halting the tradition of mudik this year,” he told The Jakarta Post on Monday.Berry, said that mudik would increase the risk of a nationwide outbreak, considering that homebound travelers could potentially carry the virus across provincial borders and the country’s many islands.According to the Indonesian Embassy in Washington, D.C., the country has 17,508 islands “of which about 6,000 are inhabited”.As regards congregational prayers during Ramadan and Idul Fitri, Berry said that the IYSF recommended the government to take up the matter with Islamic leaders.”Even if there are no lockdowns in the near future, we are calling for a halt to the mudik tradition this year,” he stressed.People will find it difficult to minimize direct contact during the mass seasonal travel, while mudik will pose an unprecedented challenge for the government to keep track of the mobility of its 270 million citizens, never mind detecting COVID-19 cases or tracing their transmission routes. (trn)Topics :last_img read more