first_imgDistance, steep ticket prices and a potentially hostile environment were not enough to keep some devoted fans from planning a trip to Norman this Saturday to witness a top-10 football clash between the Oklahoma Sooners and the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. Junior Peter Roemholdt said he is willing to endure the 30-hour roundtrip drive from South Bend in order to experience the renowned atmosphere at Oklahoma’s Gaylord Family Memorial Stadium. “The atmosphere is going to be electric,” Roehmholdt said. “I bet it’s going to be extremely loud, and especially if it’s a close game, it should be quite the experience.” Junior John Garry, who is traveling as part of the Notre Dame Marching Band, said he also is excited to support the team and be there for one of the most important games since the 2005 Notre Dame-USC showdown. Despite having to leave on Thursday and drive through the night, Garry said being a part of this game is still more than worth it. “It’s going to be rowdy, it’s going to be crazy,” Garry said. “[ESPN’s] ‘College Gameday’ will be there, so take what happened on our campus and multiply it. It should be a good day to be a college football fan.” Roehmholdt said he is also looking forward to getting a taste of the Oklahoma tailgating culture before the game. “The tailgating will be great,” Roehmholdt said. “A lot of these big schools pride themselves on their tailgates and pregame parties almost more than being at the game itself.” Garry said band members won’t have much time for activities before the game, occupied by a pep rally and with preparation for their halftime performance. “Basically we’re just there to be at the game,” Garry said. “Performing will be fun. Oklahoma fans are some of the rowdiest in the nation, so it will be great to get out there and be on the field for that.” Despite being behind enemy lines as a Notre Dame supporter, Roehmholdt said he is not concerned about having to deal with potentially abusive or belligerent Oklahoma fans. “It’s an 8:00 [p.m.] game, people will have been tailgating for a while so I’m sure there will be some rowdy individuals, but it will be fine,” Roehmholdt said. “I can handle a few ‘Notre Dame sucks.’” Garry said he expects the crowd environment to be intense due to the implications of the game, yet not as hostile as the atmosphere of Michigan. “The Notre Dame-Oklahoma rivalry isn’t quite as heated as other rivalries, and Sooner fans are known for being incredibly courteous outside the stadium,” Garry said. “Once you get inside the stadium, it will be a different story. Overall, Roehmholdt said he anticipates the trip will be one of the highlights of his time at Notre Dame. “At the end of the day you’re not going to remember the homework and the tests, you’re going to remember the experiences you had at Oklahoma for the biggest game in Notre Dame history for a long time,” Roehmholdt said. Contact Dan Brombach at dbrombac@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgBy NICOLE McALEE News Writer Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said. Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI.  The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,00s, and last year, it raised more than $6,00s, according to Ryad.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing teamebelievesyit can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an o-line giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edu,Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said.  Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI. The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,000, and last year, it raised more than $6,000, according to Ryan.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing team believes it can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an online giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edulast_img read more