first_imgBy NICOLE McALEE News Writer Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said. Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI.  The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,00s, and last year, it raised more than $6,00s, according to Ryad.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing teamebelievesyit can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an o-line giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edu,Students can join the women’s rowing team in the fight against pancreatic cancer at the team’s third annual Erg-a-Thon fundraiser today.  The Erg-a-Thon takes place between the Fieldhouse Mall and the LaFortune Student Center from noon to 8 p.m. “An erg [short for ergometer] is a rowing machine that the rowers use to train,” senior Kelsey Sekanick, co-chair of the Erg-a-Thon, said. “We will have several of them at the event and participants will be able to race both rowers and friends.” The team will sell T-shirts and bracelets at the event and will host a raffle, Sekanick said.  According to the event’s Facebook page, raffle prizes include pre-game field passes for Saturday’s football game against Oklahoma, men’s and women’s basketball tickets, basketballs signed by coaches Mike Brey and Muffet McGraw, football tickets, a football signed by Irish coach Brian Kelly and the right to name one of the rowing team’s racing boats.  Sekanick said the Erg-a-Thon was born three years ago when tragedy struck the Notre Dame rowing community.  “This event began three years ago after two women close to the heart of the rowing team were directly affected by pancreatic cancer,” Sekanick said. “The mothers of Sarah McShane, who is a former rower, and Kassen Delano, who was our academic advisor, both passed away of pancreatic cancer. In 2011, coach Marnie Stahl, hoping to encourage increased participation in service work, proposed the idea of an Erg-a-Thon for pancreatic cancer.” Senior Anna VanEgmond, co-chair for the event with Sekanick, said proceeds from the Erg-a-Thon will benefit the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PCAN) and the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), a Notre Dame entity that supports undergraduate research on campus.  “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to impact the work being done by our peers in the Notre Dame College of Science this year, [and] we hope that this relationship with Harper Cancer Institute will continue to grow as the event continues in the following years,” VanEgmond said.  Junior team member Victoria Ryan said 80 percent of funds raised will go to the PCAN and 20 percent will support undergraduate research at the HCRI. The College of Science and HCRI both will match the donation the rowing team makes to HCRI.  In its first year in 2011, the Erg-a-Thon raised almost $3,000, and last year, it raised more than $6,000, according to Ryan.  VanEgmond said the women’s rowing team believes it can raise even more money this year for pancreatic cancer research.  “This year we started an online giving site through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and due to the generosity of our Notre Dame family, we have already raised over $3,000 before the event has even begun,” VanEgmond said. “This is really a true testament to the spirit of Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole McAlee at nmcalee@nd.edulast_img read more

first_imgThursday will be Saint Mary’s third annual symposium, an event featuring research and showcasing creative works completed by students and faculty.Senior Mary Coleman, representing the Humanistic Studies department, will be on the visualization panel presenting on a medieval castle in Italy, which has the largest collection of Arthurian frescoes in the world. “I have been working on this project since the beginning on March. I developed the larger project out of a paper I wrote my one of my Humanistic Studies classes,” Coleman said. “Professor Ambrose in humanistic studies has been instrumental. She encouraged me to apply for symposium and develop this project beyond a paper.”Hope Marinkovich, a senior representing the art department, will be involved with the poster segment of the symposium.“My poster will explain the concept behind my senior comprehensive art show, which focused on upcycling and how a mindful treatment of textiles can bring us to a greater understanding (An enlightenment, even!) of our actions as humans and how they/we connect to the natural world,” Marinkovich said in an email. “At the symposium, I will also be experimenting with a performance piece, in which I will invite anyone present at the symposium to weave a circle with me and create a collaborative work with members of the Saint Mary’s community. It will serve as a demonstration of the necessity of working together with others to literally build this circular structure and metaphorically keep the upcycling movement going as a group effort.” Marinkovich has been working towards the symposium for a month, but her senior comprehensive project began way back in October of last fall “with brainstorming, finding resources, experimenting with the textiles and envisioning what [her] show would look like.”Instrumental to Marinovich’s symposium project was the support of professors Krista Hoefle, Julie Tourtillotte and Ian Weaver, she said.“[They] have not only given me their time and advice in guiding my senior comprehensive project, but have been supportive every step of the way, inspiring me with their kindness, passion, books and tea to help make this project a success,” Marinovich said.Saint Mary’s students will be given the day off to attend the symposium.“I think it is beneficial for all students to show up to the symposium, because these are research projects designed and conducted by your peers. They are interesting and diverse projects focusing on topics that are important to the students of this generation,” Marinkovich said. “Simply showing up to the symposium communicates a nonverbal message that you care about learning something new that is pertinent and important in this day and age.”Tags: Art Department, humanistic studies, Saint Mary’s College, saint mary’s symposiumlast_img read more

first_img Published on February 10, 2016 at 1:00 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse has hired Anthony Di Fino to serve as an associate athletics director for business development, SU Athletics announced in a press release Wednesday.Di Fino will have a role in decisions relating to marketing, fundraising, ticketing, sponsorship and communications initiatives. He has worked in the athletic departments at Army, Columbia and Fordham as well as with IMG Learfield Ticket Solutions at Akron and Penn State. He directed portions of ticketing, sales and marketing efforts for 13 IMG Learfield properties since becoming the Northeast Regional Manager in August 2014.While at Akron, new revenue increased by 72 percent under Di Fino’s sales team. At Penn State, Di Fino helped increase group sales by more than 200 percent, according to the release.Di Fino graduated from Fordham in 2006 and earned his master’s degree from Columbia in 2009.He joins an athletic department that has seen a significant amount of turnover since Mark Coyle was hired as athletic director last summer.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 1, 2016 at 9:42 pm Contact Byron: brtollef@syr.edu Courtney Brosnan laid still on the field with her head down. She was in complete disbelief. Maddie Dano had curved in her corner kick toward the right back post. Brosnan positioned herself perfectly, yet the ball sailed over her outstretched hands.When Brosnan stood back up, she glanced at the scoreboard. Bucknell, a pre-game underdog, took a 2-0 lead over the undefeated Orange.“The wind took it a little bit,” Brosnan said. “I thought I was under it but I just couldn’t get there. We don’t want to be giving balls off of corners.”The Orange’s defense deflected five shots in the first half and prevented Bucknell from shooting on net except for once. Within a five-minute span, the Bison scored twice.Syracuse was not ready to let its undefeated season disappear. Senior Stephanie Skilton rushed back to midfield to put the ball back in play. One minute later, Eva Gordon quickly dribbled the ball deep into Bucknell territory. She came to a halt, switched the ball to her right foot, and rocketed it toward the goal from about 25 yards out. It curved immediately to the right and flew over goalie Jessica Ratner.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHowever, the comeback was short-lived. Despite a few other opportunities in the last 10 minutes, SU (3-1-1) came up short against Bucknell (4-0) to end its undefeated start with a 2-1 loss at home on Thursday afternoon. Bucknell remained undefeated by capitalizing on chances in the box.“We didn’t play as a team today,” head coach Phil Wheddon said. “Our passing was off. We had three or four players that played well. You can’t survive at this level if only a few play to their potential.”The Orange had dominated possession and outshot the Bison, 6-2, by the end of the first half. Two near-goals that touched the goal-line were called off. In the 17th minute, Carolin Bader lasered a shot over the top of Ratner. It hit off the top of the post and bounced right on the goal line before being caught by Ratner.Syracuse trotted back to midfield, celebrating the goal. However, when the Orange turned around, Ratner had thrown the ball right back into the play. The referee ruled no goal.“I thought it was in,” Wheddon said. “Our players thought it was in. But you can’t control that, it’s the referee’s call.”Ratner was spectacular for the Bison. She faced a herd of attacks from the quick-starting Orange offense early on. Ratner came up with four big saves during the first half to keep the game tied entering halftime.The tide changed to Bucknell’s favor at the start of the second half. After failing to seriously test Brosnan in the first half, the Bison started to create more opportunities.In the 68th minute, a Bucknell midfielder passed the ball through two Syracuse defenders. Junior Kendall Ham burst ahead, settled the ball, and found herself one on one against Brosnan. Ham calmly kicked the ball past her to end Brosnan’s three-game shutout streak.“Some of these teams are opportunistic with passing long balls forward,” Wheddon said. “They can get in behind you.”After last Sunday’s win over Albany, Wheddon told reporters that he thought his team needed to do a better job at playing a full 90 minutes. When asked if they improved on that this game, Wheddon gave a firm no.“For some of the first half we connected passes,” Wheddon said. “When we did that, it was very difficult for Bucknell to play with us. But in the second half we struggled to get it going. We had opportunities that may have gone in but you can’t rely on chance.”Syracuse outshot Bucknell 11-7 but was unable to finish off its four-game homestand with a perfect record.“We just have to keep improving,” Brosnan said. “We’ve had a lot of focus on keeping the ball at the back so we can build up to our attack. We didn’t do that enough today.” Commentslast_img read more