first_imgEngland Team List (Subject to final confirmation)Garath    ArcherJos    BaxendellAlex     BennettGreg    BottermanKyran    BrackenMartin    Corry (C)Bill     DavisonJames    ForresterDarren GarforthAndy    GomarsallPaul     GustardAustin     HealeyRory     JenkinsJason     LeonardJosh     LewseyLeon     LloydDan    LugerMatt    PerryDavid    ReesMark     ReganJason RobinsonTim     StimpsonBen     SturnhamPaul     VolleyNick    WalshFraser    WatersKevin     YatesIreland Team List (Subject to final confirmation)Jonathan BellJustin     BishopPaul    BurkeShane    Byrne (C)David     CorkeryReggie    CorriganKieron DawsonGirvan    DempseyLen     DinneenGuy    EasterbySimon    EasterbyAnthony FoleyMick     GalwayGary    HalpinRob     HendersonNiall     HoganAnthony HorganPaddy     JohnsJohn     KellyKevin     MaggsEric     MillerMalcolm O’KellyNick    PopplewellFrankie SheahanJames     ToppingRichard Wallace LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Looking forward to the game Jason Leonard said, “The Legends series has seen some really competitive clashes and the 2012 game will be no exception. We will certainly be looking to entertain in front of a home crowd and retain the Stuart Mangan Trophy with some lightning speed and slick passing….. or perhaps with just a little luck and the buzz of getting back on the pitch! It is such a great opportunity for all our players to support those who need our assistance and to give something back to this wonderful game.”Tickets will start at £10, concessions £5, and are now on sale from www.quins.co.uk . You will also be able to pay at the gate.England V Ireland Legends: The Stoop; Friday 16th March 2012; Kick Off 7.45pm. England and Leicester legend Martin Corry hung up his boots in 2008will captain England legendsThe England – Ireland Rugby Legends series continues to tempt some of the greatest retired players to put their boots back on, face up to old rivals and raise invaluable funds for their teams’ nominated charities.England will be hosts for the 2012 England V Ireland Legends clash at The Stoop. This St Patrick’s weekend fixture is played the night before the two countries meet in the Six Nations at Twickenham.The money raised from the match will be donated to the IRFU Charitable Trust in Ireland and to the RFU Injured Players Foundation and RPA Benevolent Fund in England. The three charities raise money to help deal with life threatening injuries for both professional and amateur players within the sport.Following a crowd of 11,000 in the last home game, the Legends will aim to sell out this highly competitive clash with a capacity crowd of 14,000 at The Stoop. The Irish will be challenging for The Stuart Mangan Memorial Cup, currently held by the English Legends who reclaimed the trophy at Donnybrook in 2011.England’s team will be led by former captain and British and Irish Lion Martin Corry.  Martin is joined by several members of the England 2003 World Cup winning team including, Jason Leonard, most notably Jason Robinson, Kyran Bracken and Dan Luger.  Other heroes include Austin Healey and Mark Regan.  Completing the team sheet are internationals, Darren Garforth, Tim Stimpson, Matt Perry and Garath Archer– all subject to availability.Ireland’s team will be led by Ireland and British and Irish Lion Shane Byrne, previously Leinster’s most capped player. His team will include such Irish legends as Nick Popplewell, Rob Henderson, Mick Galway, Mal O’Kelly, Eric Miller and Girvan Dempsey. Other legends also in attendance will be Justin Bishop, Simon Easterby, Jonathan Bell, Kieron Dawson, Richard Wallace, Paddy Johns and Anthony Foley – all subject to availability. GLOUCESTER, UNITED KINGDOM – MAY 18: Leicester Tigers forward Martin Corry celebrates at the end of the Guinness Premiership Semi Final between Gloucester and Leicester Tigers at Kingsholm on May 18, 2008 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)last_img read more

first_img Forward grunt: Owen Franks and Tony Woodcock scrum down in training ahead of New Zealand’s Twickenham TestBy Alan Pearey, Rugby World Deputy EditorTHERE IS no need for England fans to bow down in worship as the All Blacks run out at Twickenham this weekend in search of their tenth successive win in the fixture. But those attending should be in no doubt what a privilege it is to watch arguably the greatest-ever rugby team in the flesh.Arguably? There have been great New Zealand teams before, including Buck Shelford’s team of the late Eighties that went 23 games unbeaten, and a few Springbok sides of the past were not half-decent. But has rugby been played on a plain such as this?It starts up frontDean Ryan, the excellent Sky analyst, says the skills of the front-five forwards lie behind the Kiwis’ astonishing success. Recent Tests have brought tries for Luke Romano and Tony Woodcock (v Wales), Andrew Hore (v Scotland) and Sam Whitelock (v South Africa) and support the notion that NZ’s big guys can pass and run like the best of them.Brian Smith, London Irish’s director of rugby, provides a fascinating appraisal for the January edition of Rugby World. Among the many points raised is the All Blacks’ ability to win quick ruck ball with few numbers. They have an expression ‘one man, one bullet’, which means that if an opponent is trying to steal the ball at the breakdown, it should take only one All Black to clean him out.NZ’s ability to commit so few numbers to the ruck without any impediment to quick ball is pivotal to how they play. They always seem to outnumber the opposition in all parts of the pitch, though it’s the pace and execution of their play that also leaves others gasping.Go through the gutsIf England are to beat them, they must be willing to pick and go straight down the middle, to make NZ think about numbers at the breakdown and stop them stringing an impenetrable defensive line across the width of the pitch.When they kick, they would be well advised to kick off the park – well off the park, to prevent a quick throw – because the All Blacks are phenomenal at getting men aligned for a counter. And best not to contest defensive lineouts: Woodcock’s try in Cardiff was the third time (at least) that the All Blacks have split the pods, with Australia (2008) and France (2011) falling prey to a move the Kiwis call Teabag.Chris Ashton: still a big threat for EnglandThe greatest hurdleShould England succeed, it will rank as their greatest victory. England field a weaker side than last weekend, with Owen Farrell substituting for the injured Toby Flood, who was comfortably the most-capped player in the home ranks. They made line breaks against the Boks but failed to provide the necessary support to the ball-carrier. Chris Ashton has had stick but is the only player with both the pace and intelligence to get on someone’s shoulder. His failure to find Mike Brown last weekend, the pass going to ground, owed more to Brown’s errant running line than Ashton’s inaccurate delivery. Startling statsWhile England are feeling their way with an inexperienced side, NZ’s starting XV share 788 caps and is boosted by the return of Dan Carter (not that anyone would relish facing his understudy Aaron Cruden, whose 19 wins without defeat represents the most successful start to a Test career in history).They need three tries to bring up the half-century for the year (the next best is South Africa on 23) and they are looking to extend their unbeaten record in Europe to 29 matches, England’s narrow win in 2002 the last time the All Blacks were beaten on their northern hemisphere tour. They are unbackable favourites at 1-12 on.If only they could rid their game of occasional acts of thuggery – the Hore sentence for his cowardly punch in Cardiff was disgracefully lenient – then they would be the perfect team.Prediction: Anything under a 20-point defeat for England would represent a reasonable outcome against a team that always produces their best at Twickenham.ENGLAND v NEW ZEALAND, Saturday 1 December, 2.30pm, Twickenham, Live on Sky Sports 1ENGLAND: Alex Goode; Chris Ashton, Manu Samoa, Brad Barritt, Mike Brown; Owen Farrell, Ben Youngs; Alex Corbisiero, Tom Youngs, Dan Cole, Joe Launchbury, Geoff Parling, Tom Wood, Chris Robshaw (captain), Ben Morgan.Replacements: David Paice, David Wilson, Mako Vunipola, Courtney Lawes, James Haskell, Danny Care, Freddie Burns, Jonathan Joseph.NEW ZEALAND: Israel Dagg; Cory Jane, Conrad Smith, Ma’a Nonu, Julian Savea; Dan Carter, Aaron Smith; Tony Woodcock, Keven Mealamu, Owen Franks, Brodie Retallick, Sam Whitelock, Liam Messam, Richie McCaw (captain), Kieran Read. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Replacements: Dane Coles, Wyatt Crockett, Charlie Faumuina, Luke Romano, Victor Vito, Piri Weepu, Aaron Cruden, Ben Smith.Referee: George Clancy (Ireland) LONDON, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 24: Chris Ashton of England runs with the ball during the QBE International match between England and South Africa at Twickenham Stadium on November 24, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images) last_img read more

first_imgEverything’s going to be all White: Jake White takes training with Montpellier LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS FEELING THE HEATSouth Africa’s Super Rugby players sucked in their bellies after a short holiday break and returned to the most feared part of the year, pre-season in brutal summer heat. The Stormers arrived at their Bellville base to temperatures in the low to mid-30s while the Sharks had the intense Durban humidity to contend with as well as soaring temperatures.January is usually characterised by short, intense field sessions, rather than long, sapping days in the sun. As if the heat wasn’t bad enough, the fitness coaches and medical staff were on hand to measure which players stuck to their ‘active rest’ programmes and who had extra slices of pud and more beers than they should have around summer braais. Those that fail the tests will feel the heat in more ways than one over the coming weeks.SUPER RUGBY TO UNEARTH NEW TALENTOpenside flank Jaco Kriel toured Britain, Ireland and Italy with the Springboks last November and did little more than carry tackle bags. But watch out for his menacing presence when he steps out for the Lions in Super Rugby. Kriel was outstanding during the Currie Cup and should enhance his future South Africa prospects during the tournament. The same goes for hooker Bongi Mbonambi, who has moved from the Bulls to the Stormers in search of more game time.Mbonambi was criminally underused in Pretoria but at the Stormers he should be given a fairer crack to cement the No 2 jersey, although he will be up against Bok tourist Scarra Ntubeni.Kriel deal: Jaco Kriel in action for the LionsWHITE QUIETLY SLIPS OUT OF SA FOR FRANCEAfter parting ways with the Sharks after last year’s Super Rugby tournament, Jake White spent several months consulting to the likes of Tonga and holed up in his luxurious home in the town of Hermanus, 90 minutes from Cape Town. But Montpellier lured him off the sun lounger to take on a six-month hospitable job after losing nine games in a row. White’s magic worked, with Montpellier beating reigning French champions Toulon in his first game in charge. White has historically taken struggling teams and turned them into winners in short timeframes. It started at Jeppe Boys High in Johannesburg. When he became first XV coach in 1989 the team were competitive but hardly a top rugby school. By 1990 they were the best team in Johannesburg and stayed there for the next five years. With White’s guidance the SA under-20 team went from massive underachievers to world champions in one season. The Springboks recovered from a laughing stock in 2003 to Tri-Nations champions in one year under White. They also won the 2007 World Cup. The Brumbies went from 13th in Super Rugby to runners-up in two years under White. He also took the Sharks back to the Super Rugby play-offs last year – the only South African team to reach the last six.Typically though, White’s move to Montpellier was both welcomed and lamented by the SA rugby public, with many fans calling him ‘mercenary’ and others bemoaning why such a successful coach isn’t appreciated in his own country.TREU APPOINTED BY THE STORMERSFormer SA and Kenya Sevens coach Paul Treu will make his first serious move into 15s coaching as part of the Stormers’ set-up during this season’s Super Rugby tournament. Treu, who led the BlitzBoks to the 2009 HSBC World Sevens Series title and to 14 tournament wins on the circuit as head coach over 10 seasons, will initially handle the Stormers’ defensive duties.Current head coach Allister Coetzee is in negotiations to renew his contract for another three years but there has been interest from Japan about his services. Treu, once he has gained appropriate 15s experience, could be the perfect replacement should Coetzee leave.In the middle of things: JP Pietersen playing for the BoksPIETERSEN CENTRE EXPERIMENT TO CONTINUE Bok wing JP Pietersen could find himself at centre for the Sharks during the second half of the Super Rugby competition once he returns from his Japanese club duties with the Panasonic Wild Knights. With Bok skipper Jean de Villiers in a race against time to be fit for the World Cup, Jaque Fourie retired and Frans Steyn in self-imposed Springbok exile, Pietersen has emerged as the only viable answer at 13 at international level.Bok coach Heyneke Meyer will put pressure on the Sharks coaching staff to use Pietersen in the midfield to ensure he has enough experience after playing most of his rugby on the wing.last_img read more

first_img“A lot of friends were also beaten and arrested, a lot of them left the country. But I am still here. I just hope it cannot last too much longer. This system will destroy itself.”There is currently a groundswell of calls for a democratic overhaul and big reform in Belarus. Exiled political opposition and Western figures have accused Lukashenko, who has been in power since 1994, of rigging recent elections and the nation’s police have clamped down on protests. But Shakuro, 30, is an optimist. You have to be. The scrum-half last played some meaningful rugby in the snow rugby championship in Moscow in 2019 (as well as having a run out in the same sport in Zelenograd, with the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), but with the world in the grip of a global pandemic, her and her friends still took the opportunity to make their voices heard. Related: What it’s like to use rugby to take on the mafiaIn the aftermath of her time locked up, the Minsk native says the cold and stress has exacerbated “a chronic illness” and she struggles to sleep. However, she is keen to highlight what is happening in Belarus.  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Mariya Shakuro celebrates with team-mates (Mariya Shakuro) Mariya Shakuro spent ten days in prison after protesting in Minskcenter_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “As I said, this system will fall and one day we will start a fundamentally new page in our history, as a country without a dictator,” she says. “We will have to do a lot and maybe cannot go too fast, but if everyone gives their all for that, if everyone is responsible for the job they’re good at, finally we will build a new country.”As for the rugby, Shakuro says a lack of playing numbers has meant that beach rugby has taken precedence over 15s and even sevens in recent years – though they play sevens when they can. She is part of the RC Grazhdanochka club (it means ‘Citizen female’) and the amateurs make the most of things, with Shakuro also working for a furniture manufacturer.Talking about the coming years on the field, the nine says: “In the future I hope we will have all the conditions to develop our lovely sport here. I hope we will finally have a rugby stadium, because right now we have to rent different sites with our own money. “I hope there will be rugby in children’s schools. And we won’t just think of how the game can survive, but how to develop it.” Meet the Belarus rugby captain fighting for democracyAfter a long night with the lights on, you could expect an alarm call of the national anthem blaring out. If there was any relief during the imprisonment, the expected beating never came, but over ten long days Mariya Shakuro had cockroaches for cellmates, just two showers and only two walks at 20 minutes a stroll. Hardly a fitness regime fit for the captain of the Belarus women’s sevens and beach rugby sides. This was the punishment for daring to protest against president Alexander Lukashenko’s regime – often referred to as Europe’s ‘last dictatorship’. “I was arrested at a Sunday protest on 11 October (2020),” Shakuro tells Rugby World. “All protests are illegal in Belarus.“It was peaceful by the protesters and the violence, as usual, was from the police side. But I took part in the protest because of the unbearable situation in our country. “Falsification of presidential elections. Thousands arrested, including in the time just before our elections. People going missing. People beaten. Even people killed just because of their political position. These are the reasons. “It has lasted for 26 years already, but now due to the development of the internet, the whole world knows about it.last_img read more

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ La Iglesia edifica la comunidad a través de la labor de socorro después de Sandy [Episcopal News Service] “Esto fue la Iglesia en su máxima expresión”.Las palabras se repiten una y otra vez mientras los episcopales describen cómo sus iglesias se convirtieron en centros de distribución para suministros de socorro y santuarios de calefacción y alimentos a raíz del huracán Sandy, que azotó el nordeste [de Estados Unidos] el 29 de noviembre. La tormenta barrió o inundó las viviendas que se encontraban junto a las costas de Nueva Jersey y Nueva York, interrumpió los servicios de transporte y telefónicos a través de la región y dejó millones de hogares sin electricidad y calefacción, y en algunos casos sin agua, a través de varias diócesis.Las iglesias respondieron abriendo sus puertas como puestos de calefacción, recargando [aparatos electrónicos] y puesto de alimentación; colectando y distribuyendo suministros de emergencia y comida, y despachando voluntarios para visitar e inventariar las necesidades de los que resultaron más afectados por la tormenta. En el proceso, informaron sus clérigos, las iglesias ofrecieron nuevas oportunidades de servicio y edificaron la comunidad dentro y más allá de sus muros.“La edificación comunitaria es sorprendente”, dijo el Rdo. Michael Sniffen, rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas y San Mateo [St. Luke and St. Matthew] en Brooklyn, Nueva York, en la Diócesis de Long Island. “Un montón de voluntarios han estado viniendo día tras día, de manera que hemos llegado a conocernos unos a otros”.La iglesia episcopal de San Lucas y San Mateo [St. Luke and St. Matthew] en Brooklyn sirve como “almacén santo” de los suministros de ayuda a los damnificados del huracán Sandy. Cada día, la iglesia se llena de las donaciones que luego se distribuyen a las víctimas de la tormenta. Más de 20.000 voluntarios han ayudado en esta campaña, que ha recibido cientos de donaciones valoradas en cientos de miles de dólares. Foto de Michael Sniffen.San Lucas y San Mateo abrieron sus instalaciones, incluida la iglesia misma, a la campaña de socorro, particularmente a Occupy Sandy, que empleó la organización y el poder de convocatoria de Ocupar Wall Street. Junto con una operación ligeramente más pequeña en la iglesia evangélica luterana de San Jacobi en Sunset Park, la parroquia se convirtió “básicamente en el mayor centro de entrega y distribución así como de adiestramiento de voluntarios de Brooklyn”, dijo Sniffen a ENS.Para el 12 de noviembre, más de 20.000 voluntarios y donaciones por valor de cientos de miles de dólares habían pasado a través de las puertas de la iglesia. “Tenemos de seis a nueve camiones llenos de UPS que vienen a descargar [donaciones] a la iglesia todos los días”, añadió Sniffen.Los voluntarios recorren los barrios afectados por la tormenta, determinan lo que se necesitan, luego distribuyen los suministros de ayuda que han sido seleccionados y organizados en los bancos de la iglesia. Para solicitar las donaciones específicas que se necesitan, Occupy Sandy se vale de un registro para regalos de boda de Amazon. Un equipo de cocineros ofrece de 5.000 a 8.000 comidas por día.Niños de la Escuela Pública No. 29 en Nueva York atienden el “guardaabrigos” de los voluntarios de Ocuppy Sandy en la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas y San Mateo en Brooklyn, NY. Foto de Michael Sniffen.Cada 15 minutos tiene lugar una [sesión] de orientación para los nuevos voluntarios. Participan voluntarios de todas las edades, incluidos los alumnos de la Escuela Pública No. 29, que pasaron su feriado del Día de los Veteranos atendiendo el “guardaabrigos” en el balcón de la iglesia.Una voluntaria le dijo a Sniffen que no había asistido a la iglesia en más de una década. “Esto renueva mi fe en lo que la Iglesia puede ser”, dijo ella.Un electricista de Milwaukee, que estaba en la ciudad para cuidar a sus nietos durante unos días, ayudó a instalar un generador en una iglesia sin electricidad, al tiempo que explicaba, “pensé que yo podía ser útil”.Otro hombre, de Barcelona, España, que estaba de visita en Nueva York, pasó un día seleccionando donaciones en la iglesia.“Ésas son sólo tres historias. Una muestra de la comunidad humana”, dijo Sniffen, quien hizo notar que los voluntarios provienen “de todas las tradiciones religiosas, y de ninguna”.“Creo que el hecho de que esta campaña tiene su asiento en una iglesia habla por sí sola”, afirmó. “Lo más sorprendente es el número de voluntarios que se presentan y me dicen: ‘muchísimas gracias por abrir esta iglesia’… Yo no ceso de decirles: para esto es la iglesia”.Miembros de una variedad de iglesias y otros grupos comunitarios ayudaron a preparar comidas en la iglesia episcopal de San Pedro [St. Peter’s] en Morristown, Nueva Jersey, durante los 10 días en que sirvió como puesto de calefacción, recargando [equipos electrónicos] y puesto de alimentación luego del azote del huracán Sandy. La última noche, la preparación de la cena estuvo a cargo de los miembros de la Misión de la Calle Market, una organización no denominacional que ofrece programas de recuperación a domicilio para hombres, así como servicios de emergencia para los necesitados de la comunidad. Foto de Sharon Sheridan.En la iglesia episcopal de San Pedro [St. Peter’s] en Morristown, Nueva Jersey, que sirvió más de 3.000 comidas en 10 días a personas que se quedaron sin electricidad después de la tormenta, el cocinar permitió que personas de diversas procedencias en la comunidad trabajaran juntas por un propósito común, hizo notar la Rda. Janet Broderick, su rectora.“Fue posible que personas de tan diferentes mentalidades, teologías e ideas acerca de Dios trabajaran juntas codo con codo”, dijo ella. “Sacó a relucir lo mejor de la gente”.Además de ofrecer comidas, el salón parroquial sirvió como un centro de calefacción y para recargar [aparatos electrónicos] todos los días. En las mesas, uno podía encontrarse a una persona sin hogar, acostumbrada a vivir “al límite” sosteniendo una discusión “con alguien que probablemente fuera un multimillonario sin electricidad”, dijo la Rda. Melissa Hall, asistente de la rectora. “Aquí teníamos la mesa de Antioquía”.“Nos preocupamos de presupuestos. Nos preocupamos de la mayordomía. Nos preocupamos de los boletines… y esto fue el gran nivelador”, dijo ella. Lo que llegó a ser vital fue: “¿tenemos suficiente salsa? ¿Cuánto espagueti debemos hacer para 150 personas?”Cuando el huracán Sandy interrumpió el sistema de transporte público y el servicio telefónico en Nueva York, Andrew Dietsche, obispo coadjutor de esa diócesis, fue en bicicleta desde la catedral de San Juan el Teólogo [St. John the Divine] hasta el Bajo Manhattan para supervisar las parroquias con las que no se había podido poner en contacto. Foto de Tomas Reimer.Las iglesias están perfectamente preparadas para ayudar en un desastre como éste, dijo Andrew Dietsche, obispo coadjutor de la Diócesis de Nueva York.“Muchísimas otras agencias acuden desde afuera cuando ocurren los desastres, y usualmente con más recursos. Pero lo que tenemos es lugares sobre el terreno…y nexos ya existentes con la comunidad”, subrayó él. “Especialmente en la Iglesia Episcopal, no tendemos a seguir un modelo de la Iglesia gigante. Seguimos un modelo parroquial. Tenemos una iglesia en cada comunidad, y estamos basados en la comunidad. Conocemos a la gente. Tenemos esas conexiones.“Resulta práctico, pero también es completamente consecuente con el llamado del evangelio que también atendemos: amar a nuestro prójimo”.Las congregaciones a través de las 200 iglesias de la diócesis han estado atendiendo ese llamado desde que el huracán azotó.“En verdad, todas las iglesias de nuestra diócesis han estado sirviendo a la comunidad de distintas maneras”, dijo Dietsche. “Las iglesias en el Bajo Manhattan han llegado a sus comunidades con socorro para las personas que viven en los barrios donde se encuentran”.Entre esas iglesias, la iglesia episcopal de San Marcos en el Bowery [St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in-the-Bowery] sirvió como un importante centro de distribución de ayuda. Al norte de la ciudad, San Esteban [St. Stephen’s] en Pearl River, en el condado de Rockland, y San Pedro [St. Peter’s] en Peekskill, en el condado de Westchester, desempeñaron un papel semejante en zonas que escaparon a las inundaciones, pero que sufrieron cortes masivos del fluido eléctrico, apuntó él.Si bien la tormenta afectó a algunas iglesias, “por lo general el daño fue moderado, y completamente reparable” y nada les impidió celebrar los oficios, añadió. La zona más castigada de la diócesis fue Staten Island, donde algunos feligreses perdieron sus hogares. En un caso, una madre y una hija, terminaron con sus casas condenadas debido a los daños ocasionados por la tormenta.“No estoy bastante seguro lo que podremos hacer por las personas que han perdido sus casas”, dijo Dietsche. “Tenemos que evaluar de algún modo que papel podemos desempeñar”.Respecto a las necesarias transiciones de la ayuda de emergencia inmediata a la reconstrucción a largo plazo, Dietsche dijo que él suponía que uno de los mejores recursos de la diócesis para la formulación de estrategias que respondan a esa necesidad sería su nuevo coordinador de respuesta a los desastres, el Rdo. Stephen Harding, quien “ha aportado un gran liderazgo a esta [tarea]”.Las zonas de las diócesis severamente afectadas por la tormenta están en una escala más pequeña que en las circunvecinas diócesis de Nueva Jersey, Newark y Long Island, resaltó Dietsche. A él le gustaría ver que se establecieran interconexiones a través de las diócesis para pasar a la fase de la reconstrucción, aunque no sabe aún la forma que eso tomará.En la Diócesis de Nueva Jersey, el huracán dejó a nueve clérigos, así como a algunos feligreses, sin hogar, dijo el Rdo. Francis Hubbard, rector interino de la iglesia episcopal de Cristo [Christ Episcopal Church] en New Brunswick. La parroquia ha servido como un depósito regional para las iglesias de la zona que han enviado suministros para la castigada costa de Jersey.  También se preparó para ser un centro de distribución de suministros, más grande que el promedio, en su ya existente despensa de alimentos a nivel local.La tormenta interrumpió el teléfono de la iglesia, y el servicio del celular de Hubbard estuvo irregular durante varios días. Una vez que su celular empezó a funcionar bien, “recorrí la parroquia directamente y empecé a llamar por teléfono a todos los que habían estado hospitalizados en el último año y a las personas mayores, a ver si podía localizarlos”.Algunas personas a las que localizó no tenían electricidad o calefacción, y el derribo de cables eléctricos y de árboles dificultaban el acceso a ellas. Él comenzó a buscar a otros feligreses que vivían en las inmediaciones y que pudieran ayudar y “muchísimas personas comenzaron a localizar a los que ellos conocían”, dijo Hubbard, añadiendo que él cree que esto fortaleció los vínculos entre los miembros.“Creo que esto puede edificar la comunidad, y creo que también eso te dice cuánto necesitamos una comunidad. Hay un gran pecado de superindividualismo en Estados Unidos, que somos resistentes y que podemos hacer todo por nosotros mismos, y eso es falso”, señaló. Jesús no dijo, ‘cree en mí y nunca te juntes con nadie más que crea’ Se trata de interdependencia, no de dependencia”.En la Diócesis de Newark, la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas [St. Luke’s] en Montclair permaneció abierta como un centro de calefacción y para recargar [ aparatos electrónicos] 12 horas diarias durante dos semanas y ahora ha puesto en práctica una estrategia de “comer, orar y amar” en su campaña post-Sandy: conseguir alimentos que no se echen a perder para las víctimas de la tormenta en Hoboken o a través de Occupy Sandy; orar por los que han quedado traumatizados por la tormenta; y mostrar el amor mediante dádivas, alentando a [que se hagan] donaciones a Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales, dijo el rector, Rdo. John Mennell.“Fue un asombroso par de semanas de ministerio”, añadió. “Fue sencillamente maravilloso ver a personas que dan y que se abren a los demás. Siempre creo que cuando sobreviene la tragedia y cosas como ésta, Dios encuentra algún modo de mostrarnos lo mejor de sí”.“Las personas que acudieron estaban increíblemente agradecidas”, siguió diciendo. “Algunas de ellas estaban entre los 19 visitantes de la iglesia el domingo”.Observando a la comunidad que vino a participar del oficio, Broderick descubrió algo respecto a lo que atrae a las personas a Dios y a la Iglesia.“Siempre creí que si las personas pudieran entender que Dios los ama exactamente como son, se sentirían irresistiblemente atraídos por la Iglesia, y la Iglesia crecería, y montones de personas acudirían. Y estoy decepcionada de que eso no siempre funciona”, dijo ella. “A partir de esto descubrí que la gente necesita una oportunidad de entregarse para servir”.“Es un aspecto del culto… entregarse de una manera sacrificial auténtica y seria”, afirmó. “Es realmente un aspecto de estar crucificado con Cristo. De eso realmente es de lo que se trata… de ser una persona que da de manera altruista, como Cristo lo hizo. Creo que la gente necesita de esa experiencia para conectarse con la Iglesia de una forma real. Pienso que fue eso lo que advertí, que yo no había brindado en mi ministerio tanto como realmente quiero brindarlo ahora”.Para Dietsche, “El tipo la labor caritativa que hacemos… es en gran medida la obra del evangelio… el cumplimiento de nuestro compromiso de vivir la vida como discípulos”.Y eso cambia la percepción que la gente tiene de la Iglesia, dijo Hall, de algo “antiguo y arcaico” a algo “que es realmente relevante y capaz de intervenir en un mundo moderno de manera significativa con un mensaje muy sencillo, el cual es: la mesa es para todos; todos son bienvenidos”.“Creo que para la gente fue una revelación ver esto en acción”, dijo ella. “Para mí, eso fue lo más sorprendente, en que personas que no creen en Dios, que no creen en la religión organizada, que se llaman a sí mismos espiritualistas, pero no religiosos —que todos de repente se dieran cuenta de que… la Iglesia es un modo de conectarse de una manera amorosa e inclusiva e importante con algo más grande que nosotros.“Creo que lo que ocurrió fue que las personas experimentaron la gracia”, afirmó. “Estoy muy orgullosa de mi Iglesia”.Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales está colaborando con líderes de las diócesis afectadas mientras movilizan recursos locales y llegan a los damnificados que más sufrieron.  Algunos  pormenores respecto a cómo contribuir a la campaña de socorro [a las víctimas] de Sandy a través de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales pueden encontrarse aquí y partes actualizados de la agencia relacionados con esta campaña aparecen aquí.– Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de ENS. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Por Sharon SheridanPosted Nov 20, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC By Bellah ZuluPosted Jul 19, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img [Anglican Communion News Service] An Anglican priest in Egypt has said that, far from being a divine punishment, deafness has brought children closer to the Kingdom of God.In an interview with ACNS the Revd Faraj Hanna, Priest-in-Charge of the Church for the Deaf in Egypt said the church’s Deaf Unit has provided a place where children of all kinds can fellowship together.“Through the deaf unit we can reach the unreached children from all over Egypt and it’s a good opportunity for children from all faiths to be together,” he said. “We are looking for a fruitful future where everyone can live in peace and where the deaf children can reach the university level of education.”The Deaf Unit, which currently has over 70 children, targets children and adults who cannot find or afford services in Egypt and aims to provide them with new opportunities both economically and socially.“Deaf children come and stay with us and in this way we can involve them with the church programmes,” said Mr Hanna. “We also make sure to meet up with parents of the children twice a week so that they can also learn sign language to ease communication within the family.“We are working hard to change how the parents of the deaf children treat their children since some still believe deafness is a punishment from god.”The Church in Egypt has been operating the Deaf Unit since 1982 and since then it has branched out to include teacher training programs, the Deaf Club, two new community-based rehabilitation programs in Upper Egypt and the beginnings of an audiology clinic.Last month, the children met the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and his wife Caroline when they visited the North African country. The children led morning prayers at All Saint’s Cathedral in sign language before presenting the Archbishop and Mrs Welby with a handmade wooden pyramid.The Church in Egypt has given the deaf children and youths an opportunity to play a significant role in the life of the Church. In May this year, the Primate of The Episcopal Church of Jerusalem and the Middle East, Bishop Mouneer Hanna Anis confirmed ten youths, nine of them deaf, into the church family at the Church for the Deaf.This was after a three-month catechetical class where they studied the Bible and Anglican theology and made a public declaration of faith and commitment to the Anglican Church.“We are so excited as these ten youth, along with those confirmed over the last three years, are an indication of how the church is growing,” said Mr Hanna. “All of the youth have a great vision for the future. Not only are they active in the church services, but they are all participants in the Bible Translation project, the Deaf Club and have stepped up to organise outings for the Deaf Church.”The Church in Egypt has also embarked on a project to translate the Bible into sign language in order to minister effectively to the deaf community. “The deaf community must have the gospel through their own language which is sign language,” he said.One of the main goals of the Deaf Unit is to provide students and deaf adults with the opportunity to interact not only with other deaf people but also with the hearing.The Church in Egypt has since partnered with some schools, the government, and others connected with the diocese to help the deaf children better integrate into society by overcoming stereotypes. Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Egyptian priest: ‘Deafness no barrier to faith, mission’last_img read more

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Haiti Medical Missions, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Health & Healthcare, Video: Dianne Pizey tells how her medical work in Haiti changed her life Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Haiti, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Posted Sep 13, 2013 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Video [Episcopal News Service – Miami, Florida] Dianne Pizey’s introduction to the health-care needs in Haiti came in 2006 when she took an exploratory trip to help her parish, St. John’s Episcopal Church in Minneapolis, find a an overseas mission partner. Pizey assumed her goal was to find a mission partner for St. John’s “and that my being a doctor had nothing to do with any of this.”While in Haiti she met Carmel Valdema, a public health nurse who runs nutrition clinics for children aged six months to four years at each of the parishes pastored by her husband, the Rev. Fritz Valdema, of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti.Pizey, a pediatrician, went to the clinic in Crochu and was stunned to learn that the 200 families with their malnourished children never received any actual medical care.“It just came out of my mouth: ‘I’m coming back to help you,’” Pizey recalled telling Carmel Valdema.But, she said, she had no idea how to fulfill that promise. A series of chance encounters and a networking effort later, Pizey returned to run mobile medical clinics at the Valdemas’ churches. Then the Rev. Kerwin Delicat, rector of St. John’s partner parish of St Philippe & St Jacques in Gressier, asked her to hold clinics there.Since then, “we’ve just been learning over the years; we’ve been going every six months and learning how to do things from each other and from the Haitian doctors and from Carmel and from Hilda [Alcindor, dean of the FSIL School of Nursing in Léogâne],” she said.Pizey, speaking during a break in the Sept. 6-7 Haiti Medical Missions Best Practices Symposium, describes how her work in Haiti has changed her medical practice in Minnesota – and her life.An ENS report on the symposium is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Heather Huyck says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books People Posted Nov 5, 2013 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Pat Evans says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Scott Slater says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN November 6, 2013 at 10:00 pm Ted Gleason shaped my theological understanding deeply, getting us ready for confirmation and, even more, having a series “God’s Gift of Sex” which engaged the parish of St. Peter’s Arlington VA in about 1964 arguing for the joy, significance and responsibility of sex, and taking a much more holistic view, that sex was for much more than solely for procreation. Formative and wonderful and life-shaping. Thank you to both Ted and Anne Gleason! ‘ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Forward Movement] The Rev. Edward S. Gleason, editor and director of Forward Movement from 1995 to 2005, died Thursday, Oct. 31.Known to many Forward Movement readers by his initials, E.S.G., Gleason led Forward Movement into the early days of the digital transformation. A gifted writer, he wrote numerous issues of Forward Day by Day as well as other books and articles. During his tenure, he committed to being in touch with readers, authors and supporters, writing at least twenty-six letters each day with the help and patience of his wife, Anne.Gleason developed a particularly close relationship with Bo Cox, one of Forward Movement’s most beloved authors. Gleason visited Cox in prison, and the two shared a lifelong friendship. In fact, Gleason wrote the foreword to a soon-to-be published collection of Cox’s work, I Will With God’s Help. And Cox has dedicated the book to Gleason, his friend and mentor.Before his ministry at Forward Movement, Gleason was the director of development and a member of the faculty of Virginia Theological Seminary, headmaster of Noble and Greenough School in Massachusetts, and school minister of The Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. He also served congregations as a rector and curate.Gleason and his wife, Anne, were married for fifty-eight years and spent the last several years living in Washington, D.C. They have three grown daughters and seven grandchildren. A memorial service will be held later this year.Speaking of Gleason’s leadership, the Rev. Scott Gunn, Forward Movement’s current executive director, said, “Forward Movement’s strong position in the church today is a credit to Ted’s vision and leadership. On a personal note, I will miss Ted’s humor, encouragement, and wisdom.”In the prologue of one of his books, New Life, Gleason wrote, “Life is driven by renewal, the persistent energy of rebirth that makes all things new. Pain and loss and death are inevitable, but each and every time they happen, there will be new life. Death happens, but it is never the final answer.“Everything that begins ends, and every ending contains the promise of a new beginning.” An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Obituary, Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA November 6, 2013 at 2:17 pm May God bless his family during this challenging new phase of their life. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY November 6, 2013 at 7:06 pm with deep appreciation for all his gifts. Especially for bring Bo Cox into Day By Day as an author.that was a great gift to many of us ! Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL r h lewis says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS RIP: Forward Movement mourns Edward S. Gleason, honors ‘new beginning’ Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Bath, NC November 6, 2013 at 7:42 pm I remember Ted fondly from his time at VTS. I have a cross collection on the wall of my office just like the one Anne and he had in their home. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments (4) Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Hampshire: Kevin Nichols named canon for mission resources/CFO Posted Jun 10, 2014 The Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire has hired Kevin Nichols as their new canon for mission resources/chief financial officer. Nichols is the former rector of St. Andrew’s Church in Hopkinton, NH. Previously he has served as rector of St. Stephen’s, Pittsfield, NH, and an account manager for Sealed Air Corporation, a nearly $8 billion company with 25,000 employees in 62 countries. He earned a B.A. in business administration from St. Bonaventure University and a Master in Divinity degree from St. Mary Seminary & University, Baltimore, MD. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT People Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

first_imgAs more water shutoffs loom, church prepares to canvass neighborhoods Marginalized people left out of Detroit’s rebirth By Lynette Wilson Posted Sep 24, 2015 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab September 25, 2015 at 8:47 pm Where is it written that free water is a right guaranteed to all? Everyone should realize that they ought to pay for the water they use. Just because someone exists, they are not entitled to the wealth generated by productive members of society. Everyone should pay something for the water they use. Perhaps they should sink their own private well.F William, Thewalt The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET A banner hangs behind the baptismal font in St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Corktown, a neighborhood just west of downtown Detroit. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Detroit, Michigan] On any given day, some 10,000 Detroit residents, the majority elderly women and single mothers, turn on a dry tap.It’s a persistent water crisis that has attracted international attention and condemnation amidst coverage of Detroit’s post-bankruptcy odyssey from ruin to rebirth as a city for investors, entrepreneurs, artists and creative types.For more than a year, at the same time trendy restaurants opened, competition increased for downtown lofts and apartments, and construction began on a public-private $137 million light rail train stretching three miles along Woodward Avenue, the city’s poorest residents have faced water shutoffs.“This is abject poverty, these are people who’ve had their food stamps and welfare cut, the elderly and women with children,” said Lindsay Airey, a staff member at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Corktown and a We The People of Detroit volunteer. “Of the people [to] whom we’ve delivered, at least 75 percent have children, and then probably the rest are elderly women.“They call our hotline and we try to help them until their case is resolved. We had one woman, a 17-year-old who had a child, and then we didn’t hear from her anymore because she got evicted. She was just trying to go to high school.”In the rear of St. Peter’s sanctuary behind the baptismal font hangs a white sheet with bleeding black letters reading, “St. Peter’s Water Station”; under it sits 7 gallons of water, two 1-gallon jugs and one 5-gallon jug, all that remains of a 1,500-gallon donation.“We’re out of water,” said the Rev. Bill Wylie-Kellermann, pastor-in-charge of St. Peter’s, adding the church has been waiting on a 2,500- to 3,000-gallon donation.St. Peter’s has served as a water station, storing water and making weekly deliveries to disconnected residents. A single person might receive 8 to 10 gallons a week, a family with two or three members, 20 to 25 gallons, and a seven- or-eight member family, 35 to 40 gallons, said Airey, in a conversation with Episcopal News Service in the sanctuary.“We’re at a crossroads,” she said. “We don’t want to have to ask for corporate donations.”Previous water donations have come from the Council of Canadians, a social action agency, and the West Virginia-based Keeper of the Mountains Foundation.Historically, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church has served as a base for social justice advocacy, a tradition Wylie-Kellermann continues. As business innovation and technology hubs popped up downtown, St. Peter’s invested in its building.“We turned the parish hall into a beehive of social justice – and some nonprofit organizations rent it, that’s how we pay the heat bill – all kinds of things have started in there and funded the parish,” said Wylie-Kellermann, a Jesuit-influenced United Methodist, who has served St. Peter’s for eight years.“In the case of We the People, we raised some money to give it to them for 18 months. If we were doing market rate, what you could do in Corktown, we’d be flush.”St. Peter’s sits at the southeast corner of Michigan and Trumbull, kitty-corner from a 10-acre vacant lot where the Detroit Tigers played for 90 years. The church sits practically at the center of Corktown, named for the Cork County immigrants who fled Ireland during the mid-1800s’ potato famine. Like trendy Midtown, Corktown, a diverse, mixed-income neighborhood home to artists and die-hard Detroiters, is hip.“For many years, our friends at St. Peter’s have expressed how they regard social justice through their actions,” said Rick Schulte, director of communications for the Diocese of Michigan. “This is a church that opens its doors every single day and serves its Corktown community, knowing the needs and issues that are important to all who call St. Peter’s home. Their ability to mobilize and respond to a need or situation has always been very impressive.”The Rev. Bill Wylie-Kellermann, a longtime social activist, stands outside St. Peter’s Episcopal Church on Monday, Sept. 7, watching the Labor Day Parade pass by. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSBefore becoming pastor-in-charge, Wylie-Kellermann was a peacekeeper at St. Peter’s soup kitchen, while commuting to Chicago to direct an urban ministry for SCUPE, or the Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education. His wife, the late Jeanie Wylie, daughter of late Northern Michigan Bishop Samuel J. Wylie, once edited The Witness, a progressive Episcopal magazine that folded in 2006.Arrested more than 50 times for civil disobedience, Wylie-Kellermann was among eight people taken into custody in July 2014 while attempting to block the gate of the private trucking company contracted to perform the water shutoffs.From the back of a police car, Wylie-Kellermann told the Detroit Free Press, “We’re here to appeal to the workers to stop shutting off the water.”During an interview over coffee and a bowl of Motor City chili at Onassis Coney Island, across Trumbull Avenue from the church, Wylie-Kellermann, himself a preacher’s son, told the story of one summer day in 1967, the year he graduated from the former Cooley High School.“In July, I was in northwest Detroit and I remember looking down Grand River – I feel like I was standing in the middle of the street, although I don’t know if that can be true – and saw the smoke rising from the city,” he said, adding he’d written his senior term paper on civil disobedience.“I was reading Letter From a Birmingham Jail that spring, in April, and Dr. King was at Riverside Church, that’s what I was reading as the smoke was rising.“The other person I was reading was [William] Stringfellow – he wrote a book for adolescents called ‘Instead of Death’ – between Stringfellow and Martin Luther King, I kind of understood it as a rebellion on the spot. And my vocation to pastoral ministry passes through that, I saw the smoke and my heart just kinda pierced,” he said, clearing his throat. “I feel like I have a place-based vocation. Detroit is inseparable from my calling, kind of like monks that take a vow of stability.”In 1967, Detroit residents revolted against high rates of unemployment in the African-American community, segregated schools and housing, in what some call a “riot” and others a “rebellion.” In the decades since the city’s white population disembarked for the suburbs and the city’s industrial base went the way of the rest of the Rust Belt.When asked if he were surprised about Detroit’s water crisis, that nothing is resolved despite widespread media coverage and condemnation, Wylie-Kellermann responded, “Yeah, it’s a tough nut.”Yet some say it’s a water crisis that portends a more extensive fight for water rights that already has spread to Baltimore, Maryland.In Detroit, the crisis dates back to 2005 when the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department began large-scale residential water shutoffs affecting 10,000 customers who were behind or unable to pay their water bills. At the time, a proactive affordable-rate plan was proposed but never passed. Over the next 10 years, the city’s water rates increased by 119 percent. By spring and summer of 2014, 3,000 households a week up to a total of 30,000 had their water turned off.In July 2014, more than 1,000 people wearing T-shirts and carrying signs reading “Water is a Human Right” gathered in downtown Detroit in protest of the shutoffs.At the time, the Wall Street Journal reported that 80,000 past-due residential accounts owed $43 million, with the average past-due bill $540.Residents who’ve fallen two months behind on their water bills sign on to payment plans only to find themselves falling again into arrears; other residents have found a way to exist without water, relying on neighbors, water stations and deliveries, moving in with family members or leaving Detroit altogether, said Airey.“Lots of people (lose) their homes ultimately because it (the water bill) gets tacked onto their taxes. So with the hotline, we connect them to emergency water but also help to try to navigate the assistance programs that are out there,” said Airey, estimating that some 500 people have called the hotline.Forty percent of Detroit’s 700,000 residents live below the poverty line. The city was once the fourth largest in the country, but since the 1950s has lost more than 60 percent of its residents. Outside the core downtown area, Detroit’s 140 square miles is home to abandoned factories, banks, storefronts and houses – sometimes blocks and blocks of houses – and almost a third of it is vacant land.“Detroit used to be a city of 2 million people and now it’s 700,000. So from one perspective, we have this spread-out infrastructure – how are we going to reorganize people? – and the way (the city has decided) to do that is privilege certain neighborhoods with resources and services, and pull the plug on others,” said Wylie-Kellermann.Airey and others affiliated with the church and We The People of Detroit are preparing again to canvass neighborhoods, going door-to-door to campaign to identify households without water. Previous canvassing campaigns revealed residents’ shame.“The door-to-door tells us that people are ashamed. They’ve silenced themselves,” she said. “They themselves buy into what the media says about it being their fault and they should just pay their bills. I remember when we were canvassing in the fall (2014) people who clearly had blue lines marked on their sidewalk – some would tell us, ‘Oh, no, our water’s not shut off, we pay our bills’ – so that’s part of the battle.“Monica’s constant refrain is, ‘It’s not our fault but it is our fight.’ Getting people to believe that is the hard part.”“Monica” is Monica Lewis-Patrick, the co-founder of We The People of Detroit, a community activist and organizer who has been involved with Detroit’s water fight since the beginning.When We The People formed in 2008 as a grassroots movement to train and mobilize Detroit residents to improve their quality of life, it received help from the Presbyterian Church USA.A year after a state-appointed emergency manager took over the day-to-day operations of the city and nine months after Detroit became the largest municipality in U.S. history to file bankruptcy, the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department in March 2014 adopted “a more aggressive approach to debt collection,” in a move that was declared by the United Nations as a violation of international human rights.On Dec. 10, 2014, when Detroit formally emerged from bankruptcy protection, its mayor, in a news conference covered by mainstream media including The New York Times, posed a difficult question: “How do you deliver service in a city where the unemployment rate is double the state average, and we’ve got to rebuild a water system and a bus system and a computer system and a financial system?” Mayor Mike Duggan asked. “It’s all going to be a challenge.”On July 21, 2015, the Detroit City Council voted to raise water rates by 7.5 percent.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (1) Advocacy Peace & Justice Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA F WILLIAM THEWALT says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. 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