first_imgALL tournaments planned for this year by the Caribbean Basketball Confederation (CBC) have been blown off until 2021.President of CBC, Glyne Clarke, said that the International Basketball Federation (FIBA) has mandated that all championships this year including those hosted by the CBC be suspended.Clarke explained that going forward they would monitor closely what is happening around the world because even though they are planning to have those tournaments played sometime next year, there were no guarantees that the host countries would be ready.“We will be monitoring to see how the world is recovering and it is subject to the governmental restrictions this will have on countries. Even though we may restart, some countries might not be in a position to start as well.“We are actually in the process of sending out some communication to the member countries, not only to check on their state of readiness but in terms of being able to play and what the government restrictions are.“In terms of financing, as you know many of the Caribbean countries depend heavily on assistance from the government in their competitions. So it is how well they are able to recover and to get the funding both governmental and corporate to help the teams to compete,” he said.During a recent meeting, Clarke noted that the CBC management had decided to use this time to do some online training, particularly for the coaches.“We have already started from the Americas doing some virtual programs like Zoom and so on with coaching at different levels. But what we are going to be doing too at the Caribbean level is working on developing our mini-league coaches and the mini-league programs, and also doing some training for the referees and table officials.“We are capitalising on the downtime to make sure people get the training and in many areas now people are more receptive now to doing training online than before. This also saves some cost as well,” he said.Clarke who is also chairman for the FIBA Americas Competitions Commission noted that among the events called off this year were the women’s championship which is a qualifier for the FIBA Women’s AmeriCup, the Under-15, 17 and18 Central Baskets for junior boys and girls. Then there is the FIBA 2023 Caribbean qualifier.Every year CBC, a sub-sub-zone of the International Basketball Federation (FIBA), has a packed schedule. Clarke explained that each year there were different qualifying championships within the zone.According to the CBC president, one of the challenges they are usually faced with was hosting junior and senior championships in the same year. He also said it was dependent on the country’s ability to participate.“We’ve had lots of challenges especially in the junior category. The last junior championship we had was an under-18 in Guyana back in 2016. So the challenge is when you have a junior championship like an under-16, 18 in the same year as a senior championship.“That’s the challenge we are having, we have lots of countries who are interested in competing in the senior championship, the Women’s Caribbean Cup and the men’s pre-qualifiers. The challenge is getting teams to play both. We find that in many cases when it comes to senior championships that a lot of countries opt to play in the senior championship and leave out the junior championship. So it is always a challenge when we have to host two championships in a year,” he said.To avoid such a challenge, Clarke explained that when CBC sends out its bid to host, they ask countries to host both males and females.“When we give people the opportunity they choose to host the men. The men are more competitive, they draw bigger crowds and are better able to manage the championship because they would get the receipts from the men’s championship.We found that over the years in the women’s championship, the spectatorship is not as big as the men’s,” he said. (Reprinted from Barbados Today).last_img read more

first_img“Plant fossils give first real picture of earliest Neotropical rainforests,” announced a press release from University of Florida.  The fossils from Colombia show that “many of the dominant plant families existing in today’s Neotropical rainforests – including legumes, palms, avocado and banana – have maintained their ecological dominance despite major changes in South America’s climate and geological structure.”    The team found 2,000 megafossil specimens from the Paleocene, said to be 58 million years old.  This is only 5 to 8 million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs according to conventional dating.  “The new study provides evidence Neotropical rainforests were warmer and wetter in the late Paleocene than today but were composed of the same plant families that now thrive in rainforests.”  The press release says that the fossil record from neotropical rain forests has been “almost nonexistent” – but now, it is evident that modern plant families existed then.  “We have the fossils to prove this,” one said.  “The foundations of the Neotropical rainforests were there 58 million years ago.”    The only difference between modern rainforests and the fossil record is more diversity now.  But since identification of species can only be made to the genus level, there may be some subjectivity in that judgment.  An earlier team also found the skeleton of a giant snake at the open coal pit mine – Titanoboa.  “Like Titanoboa, which is clearly related to living boas and anacondas, the ancient forest of northern Colombia had similar families of plants as we see today in that ecosystem.”    In a related story, Live Science pushed the “oldest known spider web” back another 4 million years (cf. 06/23/2006).  The web material, encased in amber, not only proves that spiders had the web-making equipment as far back as the fossil record shows, but that it has continued with little change for 140 million years according to the consensus dating scheme.All right, Darwinists: you say evolution is a fact, and fossils are the evidence.  Where is the evolution?  58 million years have gone by in your scheme, and we have the exact same families of plants today.  There isn’t enough difference to concern the most fervent young-earth creationists (notice that ICR celebrated this find as confirming of a young earth and global flood).  Surely if natural selection was acting for such a huge amount of time, we should expect to see some evolution.  Remember, you believe that a cow turned into a whale in less than half that time.  We love fossils and evidence, but give us a reason other than your own bluff to take your storytelling scheme seriously.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseIt is June 5 — the much-discussed prevented planting date for corn in Ohio. Many fields are still way too wet to plant and it is decision time (and it is not an easy one to make).What should be done?“First you need to talk to your agent to see what your prevent plant eligibility is. Looking back at the last four crop years, the highest number of corn acres you planted will be the maximum acres that you can take prevented plant on corn. You need to find out first how many eligible acres you have,” said Keith Summers, with Leist Mercantile in Pickaway County. “Then, if you decide to take prevented planting, you need to notify your agent and file notice of loss. You can plant for 20 days into that late plant period past June 5, but if you make that determination, you need to get that claim filed. You lose 1% of your insurance guarantee each day after that final plant date.”The prevented planting payment for corn is 55% of the initial insurance guarantee and for soybeans is 60% of the guarantee, unless higher limits were purchased. Prevented planting acres must be reported on the acreage report and the premium is the same as planted acres. Prevented planting has no impact on APH.Brian Frieden, director of USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) Springfield Regional Office, said there are several options are available for producers unable to plant a crop by the final planting date because of an insurable cause of loss. A producer may:Plant the insured crop during the late planting period with a reduced guarantee; 2. Not plant a crop and receive a prevented planting payment; 3. Plant the acreage to another crop after the late planting period ends and receive a reduced prevented planting payment; or 4. Plant a cover crop and receive a full prevented planting payment provided that the cover crop is not hayed or grazed before Nov. 1, or otherwise harvested at any time.Replant payments may also be available for land that was planted and does not have an adequate stand. Producers should contact their insurance agent if they believe acreage should be replanted. Producers must receive written permission from the insurance company to replant, abandon or destroy a crop.Frieden said producers who are prevented from planting because of an insurable cause of loss also must provide notice within 72 hours after the final planting date at their local Farm Service Agency office if they do not intend or are unable to plant the insured crop within any applicable late planting period. To qualify for a prevented planting payment, the affected acreage must be at least 20 acres or 20% of the crop acreage in the insured unit. Prevented planting is not available on area insurance policies, such as Area Risk Protection Insurance (ARPI).The Ohio prevented planting date for soybeans is June 20 with a 25-day late plant period that extends until July 15.“With the soybeans it is the same process as it is with the corn. You can plant into July with their late plant period. Otherwise the process is the same as with the corn as far a filing a claim,” Summers said. “But it is important that you get that claim filed. If you change your mind, that is OK. We can always withdraw that claim, but you only have 72 hours once you make that determination. If you switch acres from corn to beans, it is not a big deal. You just plant the beans and move on.”In his area, Summers said that, despite some challenges planting, there will not be a huge number of prevented planting acres in 2019.“Our advice is to our customers is to do what you think is best for you. The customers that I am talking to, they are going to plant. They are going to get a crop in the ground,” Summers said. “We have seen a little rally in prices to levels we didn’t think we were going to see. They want to take advantage of that.”For more, farmers can reference RMA’s Planting Date Map Viewer for final planting dates by crop, state, county, policy type and farming practice. Additional resources to help with this important decision, including a Fact Sheet and Frequently Asked Questions, are highlighted at https://www.rma.usda.gov/en/Topics/Prevented-Planting and https://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/2019/05/prevented-planting-2019-market-facilitation-program-payments-disaster-assistance-and-price-dynamics.html.last_img read more

first_imgThe 37-year-old Casillas fell ill during a practice last Wednesday, was rushed to hospital, and underwent a catheterization.“I can only smile after everything that happened,” he said. “It was a very difficult situation but thankfully I’m doing well.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsSpeaking to reporters outside of the hospital, without taking questions, an emotional Casillas said he doesn’t know “what the future holds,” and that the most important thing was to be standing there talking about himself.“I’m feeling much better,” he said. “I’ll rest for a couple of weeks, or a couple of months, I’m not sure yet. The most important thing is to be here.” View comments Casillas recently had his contract with Porto extended until the end of the 2019-20 season, with an option for another year.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Spanish goalkeeper Iker Casillas smiles while talking to journalists outside a hospital in Porto, Portugal, Monday, May 6, 2019. Veteran goalkeeper Iker Casillas had a heart attack during a training session with his Portuguese club FC Porto and was hospitalized May 1. (AP Photo/Luis Vieira)PORTO, Portugal — A cheerful Iker Casillas was released from the hospital on Monday, five days after having a heart attack.The veteran Porto goalkeeper said he was thrilled with his recovery but didn’t give any hints about whether he would keep playing professionally.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue LATEST STORIES Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Philippine Arena Interchange inauguratedcenter_img DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting MOST READ Cavs to interview Spurs assistant Ettore Messina for coaching post Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Porto doctor Nelson Puga said last week the playing future of Casillas would depend on several factors, including the goalkeeper’s will to keep competing.Casillas said on Monday he feels “very lucky” the incident didn’t have more serious consequences, and thanked the outpouring of support from players and clubs from across the world.“I want to thank the thousands of messages of support that I’ve received,” he said.Casillas joined Porto in 2015 after helping Real Madrid win five league titles and three Champions League trophies.He also helped Spain win one World Cup and two European Championships.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

first_imgMumbai: Veere Di Wedding actor Shikha Talsania has joined the cast of upcoming film Coolie No 1, which stars Varun Dhawan and Sara Ali Khan. “Being a part of a David Dhawan film is on every actor’s bucket list and I am no different! And to top that with an opportunity to collaborate with such fantastic actors and people – Varun and Sara – I said yes without batting an eyelid,” Shikha said. “After Veere Di Wedding, the audience will see me in a totally new lens and that’s what makes it more exciting than it already is,” she added. Varun will be stepping into the shoes of veteran Govinda, who featured in the 1995 film, which was directed by his father David Dhawan. David is on board to helm the remake as well. Sara will be filling in for Karisma Kapoor from the original. Produced by Vashu Bhagnani, Jackky Bhagnani and Deepshikha Deshmukh, the film will release on May 1 next year.last_img read more