first_img News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications Related Content News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Image courtesy of Imago Systemscenter_img News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Radiation Therapy | March 14, 2017 Reducing Radiation Could Safely Cut Breast Cancer Treatment Costs A shorter regimen is scientifically sound, but most women still get the longer therapy News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more March 14, 2017 — Over half of older women with early stage breast cancer received more radiation therapy than what might be medically necessary, adding additional treatment and healthcare costs, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.The researchers found that the annual estimated cost for radiation therapy in women older than age 50 who were potentially eligible to cut back or eliminate the treatment was $420.2 million in 2011. Had this group of women been treated with the alternative approaches that evidence suggests are as effective, the cost was estimated at $256.2 million — a potential savings of $164 million.”It’s important to look for opportunities in cancer treatment where we can safely reduce healthcare costs without compromising excellent outcomes,” said Rachel A. Greenup, M.D., assistant professor of surgery and lead author of a study published March 14 in the Journal of Oncology Practice.”Our study provides an example of a win-win situation, where patients can receive high-quality, evidence-based cancer care while also reducing the treatment burden for patients and the healthcare system,” Greenup said.Greenup and colleagues — including senior author E. Shelley Hwang, M.D., chief of breast surgery at the Duke Cancer Institute — used 2011 data from the National Cancer Database to identify more than 43,000 breast cancer patients aged 50 and older. All had small tumors that had not spread to the lymph nodes, and had been treated with lumpectomy.Previous studies have shown that these patients can do equally well when treated with a four-week course of breast radiation, as opposed to the traditional six-week regimen. An additional study demonstrated that carefully selected patients aged 70 and older had no additional survival benefit with radiation therapy when treated with tamoxifen after lumpectomy.Despite the published evidence, however, the Duke-led researchers found that 57 percent of patients who were potentially eligible to reduce or forego radiation still received the longer, costlier regimens.Using Medicare reimbursement data, the researchers estimated that the cost per patient for the conventional, six-week radiation therapy was more than $13,000. That compared to a little more than $8,000 for the shorter regimen or no cost when radiation is eliminated.Greenup said the financial analysis of cost savings in the study was limited because Medicare data do not provide as much information as insurance data, which were not available for this study. Additionally, she said, the available patient data do not provide reasons why women underwent the longer, costlier radiation treatments. In many instances, the treatment might have been warranted based on factors that were not evident in the database, or patients might have been uncomfortable reducing or omitting radiation.Greenup said the study nonetheless highlights the need to apply evolving evidence to treatment decisions.”Breast cancer treatment costs are projected to reach $20 billion in 2020,” Greenup said, citing National Cancer Institute statistics. “Of course high-quality care is the priority in cancer treatment, but our study suggests that utilization of evidence-based radiation treatment can translate into reductions in healthcare spending without sacrificing quality.”In addition to Greenup and Hwang, study authors include Rachel C. Blitzblau, Kevin L. Houck, Julie Ann Sosa, Janet Horton, Jeffrey M. Peppercorn, Alphonse G. Taghian, and Barbara L. Smith.The study received funding support from the Building Interdisciplinary Research in Women’s Health award from Duke.For more information: www.ascopubs.org/journal/jop FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享last_img read more